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Saturday
Oct192019

Submission Sunday 10.20.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


Overland Neilma Sidney Short Story Prize (Deadline November 17 – $4000)

Overland – Australia’s only radical literary magazine – has been showcasing brilliant and progressive fiction, poetry, nonfiction and art since 1954. The magazine has published some of Australia’s most iconic writers, and continues to give space to underrepresented voices and brand-new literary talent every single day.

Supported by the Malcolm Robertson Foundation, and named after the late Neilma Gantner, this prize seeks excellent short fiction of up to 3000 words themed around the notion of ‘travel’; imaginative, creative and literary interpretations are strongly encouraged. This competition is open to all writers, nationally and internationally, at any stage of their writing career.

The winning story will receive a $4000 first prize and be published in Overland’s first print issue for 2020. Two runners-up will each receive $500 and be published at Overland online to coincide with the release of the print magazine.


Reed Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline November 1)

For over 150 years, Reed Magazine has published the work of artists such as Ursula K. Le Guin, Robert Hass, T.C. Boyle, William Finnegan, Stephen Dixon, and Don George—artists whose narrative voices persist beyond print, whose imagery lingers in our minds, and whose language challenges us to think, to do, to be part of the creative legacy of our time.

Reed Magazine is for the truth-speakers:
Poets who reach universality through the chocolate chips in a breakfast pancake;
Fiction writers who craft characters that could walk off the page and into our living rooms;
Nonfiction writers, whose essays make large what was small;
And visual artists, whose work illuminates all these stories and others–the political, the social, the cultural history of humanity.

No matter your medium, the staff at Reed Magazine wants to hear your stories. Submit your poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or visual art, and let your voice be heard.


The Sun Readers Write Call for Submissions (Theme: "The Weekend" – Deadline November 1)

The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.

Readers Write asks readers to address subjects on which they’re the only authorities. Topics are intentionally broad in order to give room for expression. We publish only nonfiction in Readers Write. Writing style isn’t as important as thoughtfulness and sincerity. There is no word limit, but we encourage you to familiarize yourself with the section before you submit.


New Ohio Review NORward Prize for Poetry (Deadline November 15 – $1000)

New Ohio Review is a national literary journal produced by Ohio University's Creative Writing Program. Now in its tenth year, NOR has been the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant and support from the Ohio Arts Council. Work from its pages consistently appears in the Best American series and the annual Pushcart anthology.

We love the work of our poetry contributors and think they can help us search for the next great NOR poem. For this reason, we are instituting a new prize, "The NORward." This prize will be judged by a group of 38 of our past contributors, including Claire Bateman, Michael Chitwood, Danusha Lameris, Lance Larsen, Suzanne Lummis, and Martha Silano. The winner will receive a $1,000 Prize and publication in New Ohio Review 27. 

Additionally, any poem that receives a first-place vote from one of our contributors is guaranteed to be published on newohioreview.org, with a citation. These are "Honorable Mentions in the NORward Prize." Pieces that are not selected will still be considered for publication in our print issues (and our online editions). The contest will be judged "blind."


Slag Glass City Call for Submissions (Deadline June 15)

Skylines are made of glass; cities are at once dense, cooperative, tense, tragic and hopeful; urban space is contested territory. Slag is also a pejorative for the sexually unbound woman, but in the Slag Glass City we aim to transform margins into centers, and in doing so hope she will speak and act as she pleases. We are a journal that melds the old and the new, the accident and the plan, the rubble and the green, the rooftop and the prairie, the imaginative and the corporeal, the broken and the restored.

Our area of concern is the livable city, but our interpretation of this language, more familiar to urban planners, geographers, and city theorists than to artists, is multifaceted. We are interested in post-industrial greening of urban spaces—from rooftop gardens to elevated bike trails to vertical farms—but we are equally enthralled by interrogative art and performance that values social justice and queerness, reinvents form, and honors the green human need to pursue pleasure, beauty, and joy. We also love bicycles, and in the Slag Glass City bike trails abound.

We seek new, original nonfiction literature and art from, by, and about cities, urban sustainability, and what does and does not makes cities livable. Slag Glass City publishes continuously on the web, posting something new every month or so as we begin and more frequently as we progress. We publish all shapes and disciplines of nonfiction arts, including: stories, reportage, essays, lyrics, photographs, visual arts, film and video, digital and audio works, performance, and new web-friendly forms we’ve yet to imagine.


The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts
Call for Submissions (Deadline December 15)

The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts is a non-profit publisher of compressed creative arts, such as micro fiction, flash fiction, prose poetry, compressed poetry & visual arts, and whatever other forms compression might take. Matter pays authors $50 for their accepted pieces. We publish weekly bursts of compression & decompression and make as many varied word-plays on matter as we can.

We accept fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, mixed media, visual arts, and even kitchen sinks, if they are compressed in some way. Work is published weekly, without labels, and the labels here only exist to help us determine its best readers. Our response time is generally 1-3 days. Also, our acceptance rate is currently about 3% of submissions.


Ninth Letter Call for Submissions (Deadline November 30)

Ninth Letter is a collaborative arts and literary project produced by the Creative Writing Program and School of Art & Design at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Edited and designed by faculty and students as part of the core curricula of both programs, the journal's mission is to present original literary writing of exceptional quality, illuminated by cutting-edge graphic design. We are interested in prose and poetry that experiment with form, narrative, and nontraditional subject matter, as well as more traditional literary work.

Work published in Ninth Letter has been selected for many awards anthologies such as Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best American Poetry, The Pushcart Prize, Best American Short Stories, Year's Best Fantasy and Horror, Best Creative Nonfiction, Best New Fantasy, Best New Poets, Best of the Net, and New Stories from the Midwest. The journal has also received many national and international awards for graphic design, and has been featured in the design awards annuals of both STEP Inside Design and HOW Magazine. In 2005 Ninth Letter was named Best New Literary Journal by the Council of Learned Journals, an affiliate of the Modern Language Association.


SPACE on Ryder Farm Residency Program (Brewster, NY – Deadline November 6)

SPACE on Ryder Farm is a nonprofit residency program and organic farm located on the grounds of a 224-year-old family homestead in Putnam County, New York, just an hour north of New York City. SPACE’s mission is to create an environment singular in its ability to invigorate artists and innovators and their work, and to contribute to the sustainability and resourceful preservation of one of the oldest organic family farms on the East Coast. SPACE’s programs include The Working Farm for playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists, The Family Residency for working parents and their children ages 3-12, the Greenhouse Residency for early-career playwrights, Creative Residencies for artists and activists and Institutional Residencies for 501c(3) organizations and incorporated ensembles.

SPACE’s philosophy is simple: artists and social activists need the time and space to do what they do best--create. Residencies at SPACE are self-determined to meet the needs of each individual resident or group. The only requirements at SPACE are that residents attend three communal meals each day, share what they’ve developed while in residence at the culmination of their residency and give back three to four hours to Ryder Farm. The relationships that are forged at SPACE offer radiating benefits to the artistic and activist communities. Collaborations are sparked, relationships are built, ideas are challenged, curiosities are piqued. The connections born at SPACE last for years to come.

 

Upcoming Deadlines
 
Lunch Ticket Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Harvard Review Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Guesthouse Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose (Deadline October 31 – TBD)
Reed Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline November 1)
The Sun Readers Write Call for Submissions (Theme: "The Weekend" – Deadline November 1)
The 2020 San Miguel Writer's Conference Writing Contest (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico – Deadline November 4)
SPACE on Ryder Farm Residency Program (Brewster, NY – Deadline November 6)
Luna Station Quarterly Call for Submissions (Deadline November 15)
New Ohio Review NORward Prize for Poetry (Deadline November 15 – $1000)
Overland Neilma Sidney Short Story Prize (Deadline November 17 – $4000)
LitMag Call for Submissions (Deadline November 30)
Ninth Letter Call for Submissions (Deadline November 30)

Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)
Nobrow Short Story Competition
(Theme: "The Censor" – Deadline December 9 – £2000)
The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline December 15)
45th Parallel Call for Submissions (Deadline December 22)
Coffin Bell: A Journal of Dark Literature Call for Submissions (Theme: "Philia/Phobia" – Deadline December 31)
The 2020 Colorado Prize for Poetry (Deadline January 14 – $2000)
Arts & Letters Call for Submissions (Deadline January 31)
Slag Glass City Call for Submissions (Deadline June 15)

Saturday
Oct052019

Submission Sunday 10.6.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The 2020 SmokeLong Flash Fellowship for Emerging Writers
(Deadline October 15)

The winner of the 2020 SmokeLong Flash Fellowship for Emerging Writers will be considered a virtual "writer in residence" at SmokeLong for four quarterly issues (March, June, September, and December 2020). Each issue will include one flash by the Fellowship winner. The winner of the Fellowship will also receive $1000.00, to be paid as follows: $200.00 on announcement of the winner, and $200.00 upon publication of a story in each of the four issues in 2020.

Fellows will also participate in online writing workshops, workshopping three flash stories each quarter, with the goal of creating a robust flash portfolio by the end of the year. The Fellow will also get an inside look at the editing process, reading and voting on submissions and acting as a guest editor for one week during their residency. We are seeking a writer who is eager to work on his or her craft and excited about the idea of working with a journal and being an active participant in our little editorial family.

Writers who do not have a published chapbook or book-length work in any genre (or are not under contract for such) are eligible to apply. We particularly encourage marginalized and diverse voices, such as writers of color, writers from the LBGTQ community and writers with disabilities.


Public Books Call for Pitches

Public Books unites the best of the university with the openness of the internet. The digital magazine was founded in 2012 by Sharon Marcus, a literature professor, and Caitlin Zaloom, an anthropologist. Their mission was simple: to publish writing that is erudite without being esoteric and brings scholarly depth to discussions of contemporary art, ideas, and politics. We publish one essay or interview a day, five times a week. Our editorial staff welcomes pitches from professional and freelance writers, journalists, scholars, and artists.

Public Books began with these precepts: that experts who devote their lives to mastering their subjects need to be heard. That it is desirable for academics to speak to a broader audience, and exciting for readers outside of the academy to debate what scholars have to say. Most importantly, that boundaries between disciplines and ways of knowing deserve to be bridged—and that barriers between the academy and the public deserve to be broken. At Public Books, academics join with other public scholars, critics, and activists to make the life of the mind a public good.

LitMag Call for Submissions (Deadline November 30)

LitMag is a print journal of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, a home for award-winning, emerging and unknown writers. We seek work that moves and amazes us. We are drawn to big minds and large hearts. Print: Upon acceptance, we pay $1,000 for fiction or nonfiction; $250 for a poem, a group of short poems, or (the rare) short short. LitMag Online: Upon acceptance, we pay $250. See also the LitMag Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction.


The 2020 Colorado Prize for Poetry
(Deadline January 14 – $2000)

The Colorado Prize for Poetry is an international poetry book manuscript contest established in 1995. Each year’s prizewinner receives a $2,000 honorarium and publication of his or her book by the Center for Literary Publishing. Manuscripts will be accepted between October 1, 2019, and the postmark deadline of January 14, 2020. The winner will be announced by May 2020. The final judge is Kiki Petrosino.

The Colorado Prize for Poetry adheres to the following Contest Code of Ethics, as adopted by the Council of Literary Presses and Magazines, of which the Center for Literary Publishing is a longtime member: “CLMP’s community of independent literary publishers believes that ethical contests serve our shared goal: to connect writers and readers by publishing exceptional writing. We believe that intent to act ethically, clarity of guidelines, and transparency of process form the foundation of an ethical contest. To that end, we agree to 1) conduct our contests as ethically as possible and to address any unethical behavior on the part of our readers, judges, or editors; 2) to provide clear and specific contest guidelines — defining conflict of interest for all parties involved; and 3) to make the mechanics of our selection process available to the public. This Code recognizes that different contest models produce different results, but that each model can be run ethically. We have adopted this Code to reinforce our integrity and dedication as a publishing community and to ensure that our contests contribute to a vibrant literary heritage.”


Arts & Letters Call for Submissions
(Deadline January 31)

Arts & Letters is a national literary journal at Georgia College, operating out of the MFA program in Milledgeville, Georgia. One of the premier journals of the Southeast, Arts & Letters attracts young, fresh voices as well as well established writers. Our editors seek work that doesn’t try too hard to grab our attention, but rather guides it toward the human voice and its perpetual struggle into language. We’re open to both formal and experimental fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; we’re also open to work that defies classification. Above all, we look for work in which we can feel writers surprising themselves.


Nobrow Short Story Competition
(Theme: "The Censor" – Deadline December 9 – £2000)

Nobrow is well-known for our visual publishing and our dedication to designing and producing beautiful books. This is something we are extremely proud of. At the heart of all we do is storytelling. We believe this is the foundation on which our publishing is built – we love all forms of storytelling, be it visual, lyrical or literary. It is all aimed at transporting a reader to another place and time and keeping them there; transfixed.

That is why we are delighted to announce we are running the Nobrow Short Story Competition for writers! Up to twelve winning entries will be published in our short story anthology, and this beautifully illustrated book will celebrate the best short fiction and non-fiction writing.

Our theme is "The Censor." You can interpret this in any way you wish–it could represent censoring of the past, present and future; the self; the state; or the effects of censorship on everyday life. As a provocation we hope our theme can provide a rich vein of storytelling inspiration for anyone wishing to take part in the competition. We are looking for inclusive, surprising, ingenious and diverse responses that capture our minds and hold us until every word is devoured.


45th Parallel Call for Submissions
(Deadline December 22)

45th Parallel is a literary magazine affiliated with Oregon State University’s School of Writing, Literature, and Film in Corvallis. The magazine is managed and edited by MA and MFA student volunteers. 45th Parallel seeks work by established and emerging voices in poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, visual art, and comics with an eye toward promoting diverse voices and talents within each genre.

Our publication is named after the 45th Parallel, which is located halfway between the Equator and the North Pole. We thought the name suited our magazine, which also indulges in in-betweenness—the convergence of seemingly disparate content, forms, genres, and styles. We believe great art tends to reject strictly defined categories.


The 2020 San Miguel Writer's Conference Writing Contest (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico – Deadline November 4)

Submit your poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, and Spanish short story for a chance to attend the 15th annual San Miguel Writers' Conference free of charge. Four writers will be awarded the entire five day “Full Conference Package” (Feb 12-16, 2020) as well as have their housing provided during the conference, and a chance to pitch to a literary agent.

As the largest and most prestigious cross-cultural, bi-lingual literary gathering in the Americas, each February the San Miguel Writers’ Conference & Literary Festival attracts distinguished authors, established and emerging writers, industry experts, teaching professionals, and avid readers from the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Europe.

In addition to the 750 participants in craft and commerce workshops and 12 master classes, another 10,000+ seats are filled during the Conference at eight main stage ballroom events (keynote presentations, expert panels and seminars) with tickets available to the public. It is an inspiring week of intellectual exchange, networking, community building, and cultural celebration.

 

Upcoming Deadlines

The Calvino Prize (Deadline October 14 – $2000)
Epiphany Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline October 14)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)
The 2020 SmokeLong Flash Fellowship for Emerging Writers (Deadline October 15)
Brown Foundation Fellows Program at the Dora Maar House (Menerbes, France – Deadline October 15)
Lunch Ticket Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Harvard Review Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Guesthouse Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose (Deadline October 31 – TBD)
The 2020 San Miguel Writer's Conference Writing Contest (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico – Deadline November 4)
Luna Station Quarterly Call for Submissions (Deadline November 15)
LitMag Call for Submissions (Deadline November 30)

Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)
Nobrow Short Story Competition
(Theme: "The Censor" – Deadline December 9 – £2000)
45th Parallel Call for Submissions (Deadline December 22)
Coffin Bell: A Journal of Dark Literature Call for Submissions (Theme: "Philia/Phobia" – Deadline December 31)
The 2020 Colorado Prize for Poetry (Deadline January 14 – $2000)
Arts & Letters Call for Submissions (Deadline January 31)

Sunday
Sep222019

Submission Sunday 9.22.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


Dzanc Books Annual Book Contests (Deadline September 30)

Dzanc Books was created in 2006 to advance great writing and to impact communities nationally with our efforts to promote literary readership and advocacy of creative writing workshops and readings offered across the country. Dzanc Books solicits submissions through three annual contests:

  • the Prize for Fiction, which recognizes novels (40,000 words and up) that are daring, original, and innovative, and offers a $5,000 advance and publication;
  • the Short Story Collection, which seeks well-crafted and powerful book-length collections and offers a $2,500 advance and publication;
  • and a final contest which changes from year to year. This year, we will offer a Novella Prize, seeking sharp and creative short works between 18,000 and 40,000 words in length. The Novella Prize offers a $1,500 advance and publication.

Our contests open March 1 and close September 30. The winner of each contest, along with a short list of finalists, will be announced on November 15.


Brevity
"Experiences of Disability" Issue Call for Submissions
    

Brevity is excited to announce an upcoming special issue, “Experiences of Disability,” to be published in September 2020 and featuring anchor author Esmé Weijun Wang. The submission period will begin on October 1, 2019.

We invite brief nonfiction submissions that consider all aspects of illness and disability: what it is, what it means, how our understanding of disability is changing. We want essays that explore how disability is learned during childhood, lived over the entire course of a life, and how our changing understanding of disability shapes the way we experience ourselves and others. We are looking for flash essays (750 words or fewer) that explore the lived experience of illness and disability, as well as encounters with ableism, and that show readers a new way to understand the familiar or give voice to underrepresented experiences.

The “Experiences of Disability” issue will be guest edited by Keah Brown, Sonya Huber, and Sarah Fawn Montgomery. Our anchor author, Esmé Weijun Wang, is a novelist and essayist. She is the author of the New York Times-bestselling essay collection, The Collected Schizophrenias (2019), for which she won the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. Her debut novel, The Border of Paradise, was called a Best Book of 2016 by NPR. She was named by Granta as one of the “Best of Young American Novelists” in 2017 and won the Whiting Award in 2018.


Witness 2020 Literary Awards (Deadline October 1 – $500)

Witness seeks original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and photography that is innovative in its approach, broad-ranging in its concerns, and that dazzles us with its unique perspective. We often enjoy material that ventures into international terrain.

Witness blends the features of a literary and an issue-oriented magazine to highlight the role of the modern writer as witness to their times. Launched in Detroit in 1987, the magazine is best known for showcasing work that defines its historical moment; special issues have focused on political oppression, religion, the natural world, crime, aging, civil rights, love, ethnic America, and exile. In 2007, Witness moved to the Beverly Rogers, Carol C. Harter Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The magazine now publishes one special print issue and one general online issue each year and increasingly seeks out work that contextualizes the American experience by highlighting issues of global concern.


Palooka Call for Submissions

We're open to many voices, forms, and styles. Please send your best unpublished chapbooks, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, artwork, photography, and graphic narratives.

Palooka is an international literary magazine of unique fiction, poetry, nonfiction, artwork, photography, and graphic narratives. We've featured writers, artists, and photographers from United States, Canada, Australia, India, United Kingdom, China, Pakistan, Spain, France, Ireland, South Korea, Israel, Finland, Italy, and Austria. The magazine was founded on the idea of giving a fair chance at publication to writers, artists, and photographers, regardless of who they are, where they come from, or who they know. We read blind, don't solicit work or publish friends/associates, and only publish work that comes to us from the infamous "slush pile." We strive to create fun and unique covers and offer eclectic works that interest a wide variety of readers.


Luna Station Quarterly Call for Submissions (Deadline November 15)

The on-going mission of Luna Station Quarterly is to display the vast and varied talents of women-identified speculative fiction writers. This idea was conceived by founding editor, Jennifer Lyn Parsons, after spending time in the trenches of the Star Wars fan fiction community and being exposed to the particular and unique writing styles of the women and girls who posted there. Later departing from the community to write original fiction, Jennifer became aware of the apparent lack of support for the short story format within the literary community, and the particular lack of exposure of new women writers in general within speculative fiction.

Luna Station Quarterly publishes speculative fiction written by women-identified authors. We think women write awesome characters and really cool stories and we want to show it to the world. We will consider stories submitted by any woman writer, regardless of experience or writing resume. If you consider yourself on the woman end of the gender spectrum in any significant capacity, you’re welcome here!


The Cave Canem 2019 Toi Derricotte & Cornelius Eady Chapbook Prize (Deadline September 30 – $500)

Launched in 2015, the Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady Chapbook Prize is dedicated to the discovery of exceptional chapbook-length manuscripts by Black poets. Winner receives $500, publication by Jai-Alai Books in 2020, 10 copies of the chapbook, a residency in early April at The Writer’s Room at The Betsy Hotel in Miami and a feature reading at the O, Miami Poetry Festival. Final Judge: Danez Smith.

Founded by Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady in 1996 to remedy the under-representation and isolation of African American poets in the literary landscape, Cave Canem Foundation is a home for the many voices of African American poetry and is committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets. A 501-c-3 non-profit literary service organization with administrative and programming headquarters in Brooklyn, NY, Cave Canem has grown from a gathering of 26 poets to become an influential movement with a renowned faculty, high-achieving national fellowship of over 400 and a workshop community of 900. Our operating budget has increased from $20,000 in 1996 to $450,000 in 2015, with significant grant awards from such funders as Lannan Foundation, Whiting Foundation, New York Community Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Pittsburgh.


Little Fiction
2020 Flash Issue Call for Submissions
(Deadline November 30)

Flash is back. On the heels of our first flash issue in quite some time, we’re setting out to do it all again. We’re looking for your short, not so sweet, stories for our 2020 Flash issue. Open to stories that are 1,000 words or less. We’ll choose a dozen or so stories to appear in the issue, scheduled for publication early 2020.

Little Fiction was launched as a labour of love by Troy Palmer in October 2011. It started kinda slowly, but when things started moving, they really started moving. The best proof of that was when the amazingly talented and insanely hard-working writer, Amanda Leduc, said to him “Hey, you should publish non-fiction stuff. And I can be your non-fiction editor!” The answer was, of course, YES. And the result was BIG TRUTHS. We publish our stories and essays on the first Wednesday of every month (#WriterWednesday for your Twitter folk).


A Hotel Room of One's Own: The Erma Bombeck | Anna Lefler Humorist-in-Residence Program
(Dayton, OH – Deadline September 24)

The Erma Bombeck | Anna Lefler Humorist-in-Residence Program is the only one of its kind: a writing residency specifically for emerging humor writers. Located adjacent to the University of Dayton — alma mater of legendary humorist Erma Bombeck — the Humorist-in-Residence Program gives two emerging comedy writers the opportunity to step away from their regular routines to live and procrastinate work as full-time writers. Where? At the University of Dayton Marriott, of course.

That’s the idea behind “A Hotel Room of One’s Own” — private, uninterrupted time for two writers to dive into their comedy projects without restrictions or responsibilities. It’s the luxury of time, and an experience that can change a career. Plus room service!



Upcoming Deadlines

A Hotel Room of One's Own: The Erma Bombeck | Anna Lefler Humorist-in-Residence Program (Dayton, OH – Deadline September 24)
Dzanc Books Annual Book Contests (Deadline September 30)
Salt Hill Journal Call for Submissions (Deadline September 30)

The Philip Levine Prize for Poetry (Deadline September 30 – $2000)
The Lascaux Prize in Creative Nonfiction (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
Boulevard
Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
The Cave Canem 2019 Toi Derricotte & Cornelius Eady Chapbook Prize (Deadline September 30 – $500)
Witness 2020 Literary Awards (Deadline October 1 – $500)
Zoetrope: All-Story Short Fiction Competition (Deadline October 1 – $1000) 
The Missouri Review Jeffrey E. Smith Editors Award (Deadline October 1 – $5000)
Electric Literature 2020 "Stories Out of School" Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline October 1)
The Calvino Prize (Deadline October 14 – $2000)
Epiphany Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline October 14)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)
Brown Foundation Fellows Program at the Dora Maar House (Menerbes, France – Deadline October 15)
Lunch Ticket Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Harvard Review Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Guesthouse Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose (Deadline October 31 – TBD)
Luna Station Quarterly Call for Submissions (Deadline November 15)
Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)
Coffin Bell: A Journal of Dark Literature Call for Submissions (Theme: "Philia/Phobia" – Deadline December 31)

Sunday
Sep082019

Submission Sunday 9.8.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The Calvino Prize (Deadline October 14 – $2000)

The Calvino Prize is an annual fiction competition sponsored by the Creative Writing Program in the English Department of the University of Louisville. They will be awarded to outstanding pieces of fiction in the fabulist experimentalist style of Italo Calvino. Please note that these prizes are meant to encourage experimental writing, in the mode of Calvino, and are not meant to encourage merely imitative work.

The first place entry will be published in Miracle Monocle journal at the University of Louisville. Further, the winner will be invited to read the winning entry, all expenses paid (within the continental US), at the Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900 held at the University of Louisville every February. The 10 finalists will be posted on the website.


Hippocampus Magazine Call for Submissions (Theme: Lost – Deadline September 15)

Hippocampus Magazine is excited to announce this year’s theme issue. Between now and Sept. 15, 2019, we’re accepting pieces up to 4,000 that connect to the theme: LOST. We're an online publication set out to entertain, educate and engage writers and readers of creative nonfiction. We also have a books division and bring our mission to life with an annual writing conference.

Do you have a story about a time you were literally lost — maybe on a winding back road, in a sprawling city, or inside a cavernous building? Or maybe you were metaphorically lost, unsure of your life’s direction, until that one moment or one person changed everything. Your LOST story could: recap the time you were lost in love (now Air Supply is stuck in our heads); reflect on what happened with a physical object of sentimental (or monetary) value went missing; detail a time you didn’t come out on top in a game, competition, or race.


Harvard Review Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)

In 1986 poet and novelist Stratis Haviaras, then Curator of the Woodberry Poetry Room in Harvard’s Lamont Library, founded a quarterly periodical called Erato. Its purpose was to publicize the activities of the Poetry Room and create a new forum for discussion of current literary matters and events. The first issue of Erato, which was just four pages long, featured a poem by Seamus Heaney, a short piece on Louis Simpson, and a news item from Harvard University Press. Tipped into the issue were three loose-leaf pages of book reviews, including reviews of works by Joseph Brodsky, Marguerite Duras, and Richard Ford.

Within three years the book review section had grown to over thirty pages and the publication was renamed Harvard Book Review. In 1992 Haviaras launched Harvard Review, a perfect-bound journal of some 200 pages, published semi-annually and incorporating the old Harvard Book ReviewThe journal provided a forum for criticism along with new poetry and short fiction. In 2000 Haviaras retired from Harvard and Christina Thompson was appointed editor; responsibility for the review shifted from Lamont to Houghton Library at this time.

Contributors to Harvard Review have included such literary giants as Seamus Heaney, Sonia Sanchez, and David Foster Wallace. Pulitzer Prize-winners Jhumpa Lahiri and Paul Harding both made their literary debuts in the journal, alongside such writers as Andrea Barrett, Yusef Komunyakaa, Sharon Olds, David Mamet,  Tracy K. Smith, Claire Messud, Robert Pinsky, Nam Le, and Lily King. Writing from Harvard Review is regularly selected for Best American Poetry, Best American Essays, Best American Short Stories, Best American Mystery Stories, Best American Science and Nature Writing, Best American Travel Writing, PEN America Best Debut Short Stories, The O. Henry Prize Stories, Best New Poets, and The Pushcart Prize Anthology. 


Guesthouse
Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose
(Deadline October 31 – TBD)

Googie: Post-modern architecture influenced by jets, robots, The Space and The Atomic Age. These buildings capture the motions of atoms, orbitals, and parabolas in glass, neon, and steel and aimed to replicate future speculation in real time. 

Guesthouse is pleased to announce The Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose, designed to honor the best speculative fiction today and harness the community-building power of competition in the arts. One piece of prose will be selected by our judge as the winner and published in Guesthouse issue five in 2020. We hope to model a new formula for our prose contest by borrowing what we see working among our peers and predecessors but also testing the waters of a transparency-based approach. We will divvy up the contest proceeds into four pots.

Lunch Ticket Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)

Lunch Ticket is the online literary and art journal published by the MFA community of Antioch University (AU), a program devoted to the education of literary artists, community engagement, and the pursuit of social, economic, and environmental justice. The editors of Lunch Ticket share AU’s mission and values. With a commitment to publishing the best literary writing and visual art, we encourage submissions from underrepresented and marginalized artists and writers.


Epiphany Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline October 14)

Epiphany, a semiannual literary magazine, was established in 2001. We feature fiction, nonfiction, poetry, graphic literature, and visual art. Our contributors have included emerging writers alongside iconic literary voices such as Elena Ferrante, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Vijay Seshadri, Derek Walcott, and Man Booker Prize winner Jessica Cohen. Our ethos locates in the celebration of epiphanic work that reveals the capacious potential of literature. Epiphany is committed to publishing literary work, wherever it may fall on the spectrum from experimental to traditional, that is realized both in its vision and its devotion to artistry. We are especially open to writers whose explorations of new territory may not yet have found validation elsewhere.


The Philip Levine Prize for Poetry (Deadline September 30 – $2000)

The Philip Levine Prize for Poetry is an annual book contest sponsored by the Creative Writing Program at California State University, Fresno. This contest -- open to any poet writing in English (except current or former students or faculty of Fresno State) -- offers a $2,000 prize and publication by Anhinga Press, a Florida-based press that has been publishing poetry for more than 45 years.

The contest is named for the late poet Philip Levine, who served as the final judge in 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2013. Levine taught at Fresno State for many years and is one of the most highly honored and widely read American poets. He published 16 books of poems, as well as several volumes of translations and two collections of essays. His list of honors included two National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle Awards, the American Book Award, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize for Distinguished Poetic Achievement, the Wallace Stevens Award and the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Levine served as United States poet laureate from 2011-2012.


Brown Foundation Fellows Program at the Dora Maar House (Menerbes, France – Deadline October 15)

Located in the village of Ménerbes, in one of the most beautiful regions of southern France, this 18th-century town house was purchased in 1944 by Pablo Picasso for Dora Maar, the artist and Surrealist photographer who was his companion and muse in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Maar (1907–1997) owned the house until her death, after which a resident of both Houston and Ménerbes bought and renovated the house to transform it into a retreat for writers, scholars, and artists.

In 2006, the MFAH was asked to direct this project, now called the Brown Foundation Fellows Program at the Dora Maar House. Amenities include four private bedrooms, each with a private bath; three studies for writers and scholars; a studio for artists; and a piano. Residents share the kitchen, library, living, and dining rooms, and two garden areas. The village of Ménerbes holds the official classification as one of “the prettiest villages of France.” Nostradamus claimed that Ménerbes, which sits on a narrow spine of a hilltop, looked like a ship in an ocean of vineyards. For its small size of about 1,200 residents, the village offers a surprisingly lively slate of cultural activities, restaurants, shops, galleries, hotels, and cafés.

 

Upcoming Deadlines

Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
Hippocampus Magazine Call for Submissions (Theme: Lost – Deadline September 15)
Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Residency Program (Amherst, VA – Deadline September 15)
The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship (Deadline September 17 – $83,000)
Salt Hill Journal Call for Submissions (Deadline September 30)

The Philip Levine Prize for Poetry (Deadline September 30 – $2000)
The Lascaux Prize in Creative Nonfiction (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
Boulevard
Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
Zoetrope: All-Story Short Fiction Competition (Deadline October 1 – $1000) 
The Missouri Review Jeffrey E. Smith Editors Award (Deadline October 1 – $5000)
Electric Literature 2020 "Stories Out of School" Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline October 1)
The Calvino Prize (Deadline October 14 – $2000)
Epiphany Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline October 14)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)
Brown Foundation Fellows Program at the Dora Maar House (Menerbes, France – Deadline October 15)
Lunch Ticket Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Harvard Review Call for Submissions (Deadline October 31)
Guesthouse Googie Goer Prize for Speculative Prose (Deadline October 31 – TBD)
Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)

Saturday
Sep072019

Submission Sunday 9.22.19

PRISM International Pacific Spirit Poetry Prize (Deadline October 15 – $1500)

PRISM international is a quarterly magazine out of Vancouver, British Columbia, whose office is located on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm people. Our mandate is to publish the best in contemporary writing and translation from Canada and around the world. Writing from PRISM has been featured in Best American Stories, Best American Essays and The Journey Prize Stories, amongst other noted publications.

The mandate of the magazine’s website is to provide a supplement to the print edition that connects readers with the literary community through author interviews, book reviews, news about Canadian writing and publishing events, and other information of interest to our readers, many of whom are writers themselves.

Through both these avenues, PRISM strives to uplift and shine a light on emerging and established voices across Canada and internationally, and are especially committed to providing a platform for folks who have been systematically marginalized in the literary community, including but not limited to BIPOC groups, cis women, trans women and men, nonbinary people, people with disabilities, and members of the LGBTQ2S community.

 

Sunday
Aug252019

Submission Sunday 8.25.19



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The Lascaux Prize in Creative Nonfiction
(Deadline September 30 – $1000)

Creative nonfiction may include memoirs, chronicles, personal essays, humorous perspectives, literary journalism—anything the author has witnessed, experienced, learned, or discovered. Creative nonfiction should be written in a nonacademic style. Pieces may be previously published or unpublished, and simultaneous submissions are accepted. Winner receives $1,000, a bronze medallion, and publication in The Lascaux Review. The winner and all finalists will be published in The Lascaux Prize Anthology Vol 7.

The Lascaux Review seeks fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction of literary quality. Lascaux has published work by Philip Appleman, Hélène Cardona, Joseph Fasano, Tony Hoagland, Lee Martin, Maggie Smith, Robley Wilson, and many other poets and writers. Annual contests are conducted in poetry, flash fiction, creative nonfiction, and short fiction.


Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)

“Thousands have lived without love; not one without water.” In the spirit of W.H. Auden’s words, this forthcoming special issue of the Michigan Quarterly Review will explore urgent, complex, and revelatory writing on water from around the world. “Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water” will explore the paradoxes of water, how at once it gives life and takes it; how it divides us along cruel lines of inequality even as it binds us. Water connects us, and our planet, to our origins and to an indivisible fate.

We are seeking work that addresses any aspect of water: from the contested oil pipeline beneath the Straits of Mackinac to water shut-offs in Cape Town; from flooding in the Midwest to water scarcity in India and the Sahel; from the role of water in regional and global conflict and migration to the way that storm surges and shifting coastlines are forcing us to rethink the shapes of urban centers.

We are looking for pieces that consider water through the lens of history and of contemporary geopolitics, and are excited to receive submissions that consider water through mythology, religion, and art history. We welcome a range of genres, including nonfiction, fiction, poetry, drama, translations, and pieces that don’t fit into a neat category.


Zoetrope: All-Story
Short Fiction Competition
(Deadline October 1 – $1000)

Guest Judge: Tommy Orange, winner of the 2019 PEN/Hemingway Award and finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for There There, and an honorable mention in the 2013 Zoetrope: All-Story Short Fiction Competition.

First prize: $1,000
Second prize: $500
Third prize: $250

The three prizewinners and seven honorable mentions will be considered for representation by William Morris Endeavor; ICM; the Wylie Agency; Aragi, Inc.; Regal Literary; Dunow, Carlson & Lerner Literary Agency; Markson Thoma Literary Agency; Inkwell Management; Sterling Lord Literistic; Aitken Alexander Associates; Barer Literary; the Gernert Company; Janklow & Nesbit Associates; and the Georges Borchardt Literary Agency. Results will be announced at the website December 16 and in the Winter 2019/2020 issue of Zoetrope: All-Story; and the winning story will be published as a special online supplement to that Winter 2019/2020 issue.


Breakwater Review
Call for Submissions

Breakwater Review was founded in 2009 and is run by students of the University of Massachusetts Boston MFA program. We currently publish digitally three times a year.

A breakwater is a barrier of rocks or concrete, built out into a body of water to protect a coast or harbor from extreme weather and hazardous conditions. In a world that oftentimes feels shattered and broken, we seek to publish both established and (more importantly) new voices from diverse backgrounds. Words that unite us against the storm—challenging our own perceptions of reality in fresh and interesting ways.


The First Annual Orca Cover Letter Contest (Deadline August 31 – $200)

We at Orca pride ourselves on being a bit different. That applies to our first contest too. Instead of a traditional short story or flash contest, we’re holding our first Orca Cover Letter Contest through August. Send us entries of up to 300 words that make us laugh, or cry, or just want to read the imaginary story it introduces.

Orca is about fiction. Short stories and flash. We are a literary journal and we believe in the literary style of writing. We are open to any topic, as long as it’s written in a literary style. We are open to all writers, without prejudice or preference. We seek work that is high concept: imaginative, thoughtful, even speculative, open to possibilities. Give us deep, diverse characters. Blend genres. Connect seemingly disparate ideas. Keep it entertaining, but make us think. 


Inlandia: A Literary Journey
Call for Submissions
(Deadline August 31)

We are primarily seeking stories, poems, novel excerpts, memoir, images, etc., by writers and artists whose work is in some way grounded in the Inland Southern California region; works that will give readers around the globe a sense of the region and its people.

To give a clearer picture of where this region is located, it is in the southeastern corner of California and encompasses all of Riverside and San Bernardino counties from the heights of San Gorgonio Mountain to the lows of Death Valley, from the wineries of Temecula to the shuttered citrus packing houses of Riverside, and all points in-between.

Above all else we want fresh, compelling writing. Inlandia: A Literary Journey is the official online literary journal of the Inlandia Institute. Founded in 2010, Inlandia: A Literary Journey is published annually.


Electric Literature 2020 "Stories Out of School" Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline October 1)

Electric Literature has partnered with Academy for Teachers to host the 2020 “Stories Out of School” Flash Fiction Contest.

Teachers have one of the most fascinating, difficult, and important jobs on the planet, and their work days are filled with stories. Yet teachers seldom appear in fiction. This annual contest was created to inspire honest, unsentimental stories about teachers and the rich and complex world of schools. This year, the Academy for Teachers has partnered with Electric Literature to publish the winning entry. 

The first-prize winner will receive $1,000 and the story will be published online in The Commuter, our home for brief, diverting, and innovative writing. The second-prize winner will receive $500. Susan Choi will judge this year’s contest. She’s the author of five novels: My Education, A Person of Interest, The Foreign Student, American Woman, and, most recently, Trust Exercise. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship and the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award.


Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Residency Program
(Amherst, VA – Deadline September 15)

Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (VCCA), one of the leading artists communities in the world with locations in Amherst, Virginia, and Auvillar, France, hosts more than 400 visual artists, writers, and composers each year. The artists who come to VCCA, whether emerging or established, are selected by peer review on the basis of the important or innovative work they are doing in their respective fields. In residence, VCCA artist-Fellows are provided with an individual studio, a private bedroom and three prepared meals a day so they can focus exclusively on their work. While uninterrupted time is assured and participation in community events or public engagement is voluntary, the dynamic interaction among the 25 Fellows in residence together, as they share work, discuss process, and enjoy each other’s company, is an important component of the creative space of VCCA. With a tradition of hospitality and welcome, VCCA schedules a diverse cohort of artists across disciplines.

The Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (VCCA) is committed to diversity and inclusivity. We encourage writers, visual artists, and composers of all backgrounds to apply for residency. VCCA believes in nondiscrimination and equal opportunity with regard to race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, physical ability or disability, or veteran status. We are committed to a residency experience that encompasses the widest possible selection of people and perspectives.

 

Upcoming Deadlines

Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
Inlandia: A Literary Journey
Call for Submissions
(Deadline August 31)
The First Annual Orca Cover Letter Contest (Deadline August 31 – $200)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Asian American Literary Review Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Ucross Foundation Residency Program (Ucross, WY – Deadline for Spring 2020 – September 1)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Residency Program (Amherst, VA – Deadline September 15)
The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship (Deadline September 17 – $83,000)
Salt Hill Journal Call for Submissions (Deadline September 30)

The Lascaux Prize in Creative Nonfiction (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
Boulevard
Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
Zoetrope: All-Story Short Fiction Competition (Deadline October 1 – $1000)
The Missouri Review Jeffrey E. Smith Editors Award (Deadline October 1 – $5000)
Electric Literature 2020 "Stories Out of School" Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline October 1)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)
Michigan Quarterly Review Call for Submissions (Not One Without: A Special Issue on Water – Deadline December 1)

Sunday
Aug112019

Submission Sunday 8.11.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

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Ucross Foundation Residency Program
(Ucross, WY – Deadline for Spring 2020 – September 1)

The mission of Ucross Foundation is to foster the creative spirit of deeply committed artists and groups by providing uninterrupted time, studio space, living accommodations, and the experience of the majestic High Plains while serving as a good steward of its historic 20,000-acre ranch.

The Ucross Foundation Residency Program offers the gift of time and space to competitively selected individuals working in all artistic disciplines. The Foundation strives to provide a respectful, comfortable and productive environment, freeing artists from the pressures and distractions of daily life. As painter Carol Schwennesen commented, "There has been no other art experience that has been as wide and deep and solid as the experience of being at Ucross."

The Ucross Foundation provides living accommodations, individual work space, and uninterrupted time to approximately 85 individuals each year. Typical residencies are one month in length but can vary from two to six weeks. At any one time, there are up to ten individuals in residence, a mix of visual artists, writers and composers. In most cases, studios are separate from living quarters. Lunch and dinners are prepared Monday to Friday by a professional chef with ample provisions on hand for breakfasts and weekends. Residents are responsible for providing their own working materials and for their travel to Sheridan, Wyoming. There is no charge for a residency.


The Missouri Review
Jeffrey E. Smith Editors Award
(Deadline October 1 – $5000) 

Winners in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry receive publication, invitation to a reception and reading in their honor, and a cash prize. The Missouri Review, founded in 1978, is one of the most highly-regarded literary magazines in the United States and for the past four decades we’ve upheld a reputation for finding and publishing the very best writers first. We are based at the University of Missouri and publish four issues each year. Each issue contains approximately five new stories, three new poetry features, and two essays, all of which is selected from unsolicited submissions sent from writers throughout the world.

The Missouri Review maintains an “open submission” policy and read year round, sifting through approximately 12,000 submissions each year. New, emerging, and mid-career writers whose work has been published in the Missouri Review have been anthologized over 100 times in Best American Short Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Travel Writing, Best American Poetry, The O. Henry Prize Anthology, and The Pushcart Prize. We are also pleased to be the first to have published the fiction of many emerging writers, including Katie Chase, Nathan Hogan, Jennie Lin, Susan Ford, and Elisabeth Fairchild. Writers whose work first appeared in the Missouri Review continue to win major prizes, including the National Book Award, the Yale Younger Poets Award, MacArthur Foundation “Genius” awards, and the Pulitzer Prize.


The Los Angeles Press Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)

The Los Angeles Press publishes the best in emerging art, literature, and political discourse, from Southern California, the West, and beyond. We are committed to uplifting and focusing on Voices Yet Heard, including Women, POC, LGBTQ+, and traditionally under-represented and marginalized artists and writers.

The Los Angeles Press is a Print and Online Publishing House & Imprint, introduced by The Los Angeles Review of Books and the LARB/USC Publishing Cohort. We are devoted to community engagement, and to the pursuit of social, economic, and environmental justice.


The Writer
Summer 2019 Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline August 15 – $1000)

Summer seems like the right time to write short. Show us your very best work in any genre, fiction or nonfiction. The catch? We’ll only accept works that are 1,000 words or less.

Founded in 1887, The Writer is one of the nation’s oldest magazines focusing on the craft of writing. The Writer is dedicated to expanding and supporting the work of professional and aspiring writers with a straightforward presentation of industry information, writing instruction and professional and personal motivation. In the pages of our magazine, writers share experiences, expertise, struggles, advice, successes, and suggestions.


Salt Hill Journal Call for Submissions (Deadline September 30)

Salt Hill is a biannual literary journal publishing outstanding new fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and art by people at various stages in their literary and artistic careers. We publish new and emerging writers alongside those with long, illustrious careers in the literary arts. Previous contributors include Terrance Hayes, Patricia Smith, Eduardo C. Corral, Laura Kasischke, W. S. Merwin, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Mary Ruefle, Sam Sax, Charles Simic, James Tate, Jean Valentine, Dean Young, and even Stephen King, among so many brilliant others. Salt Hill is produced by writers in and affiliated with the Graduate Creative Writing Program at Syracuse University and is funded in part by the College of Arts & Sciences and the Graduate Student Organization of Syracuse University.

We are interested in work that shines, work that represents a broad spectrum of experience, and work that makes us feel in new and exciting ways. In order to put out the best magazine we can, full of all that is glimmering, we believe it is critical to lift up the voices of writers and artists who have been traditionally underrepresented in the literary arts. As such, we feel a strong urgency to read and consider work by people of color, women, queer people, non-binary folks, and anyone else who has been marginalized by the institutions which have, for so long, dominated the publishing scene.


Boulevard
Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers (Deadline September 30 – $1000)

$1,000 and publication in Boulevard awarded to the winning essay by a writer who has not yet published a book of fiction, poetry, or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press. Boulevard was founded in 1984 in New York City and incorporated in 1985 as a nonprofit by writer Richard Burgin. Its first issue, published January 2, 1986, featured fiction by Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer, poetry by Kenneth Koch, and interviews with renowned composers Philip Glass and Steve Reich and an essay on John Dos Passos and the Soviet Cinema. By its third issue in 1987, Boulevard had attained national bookstore distribution, which continues into the present.

Boulevard has published works by generations of important writers and critics, including John Ashbery, Ann Beattie, Billy Collins, Mark Doty, Jennifer Egan, Donald Hall, Alice Hoffman, David Mamet, Joyce Carol Oates, Carl Phillips, Francine Prose, Gerald Stern, Mark Strand, and others. Poet laureate Daniel Hoffman has called Boulevard “One of the half-dozen best literary journals.”


The Asian American Literary Review
Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)

The Asian American Literary Review is a space for writers who consider the designation “Asian American” a fruitful starting point for artistic vision and community. In showcasing the work of established and emerging writers, the journal aims to incubate dialogues and, just as importantly, open those dialogues to regional, national, and international audiences of all constituencies. We select work that is, as Marianne Moore once put it, “an expression of our needs…[and] feeling, modified by the writer’s moral and technical insights.” Published biannually, AALR features fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, translations, comic art, interviews, and book reviews.


PLAYA Art & Science Residency Program (Summer Lake, OR – Deadline August 15)

Since its founding in 2009, PLAYA has provided residencies to hundreds of artists and scientists. These gifts of time have allowed room for deep work, far-reaching conversations, and sustaining connections to the community. PLAYA supports independent individuals by giving them time and space to focus on their creative work and personal process. While at PLAYA, residents comprise a cohort that depends on the respect and good intentions of all for a positive experience.

The 75–acre property includes six fully equipped and spacious cabins, two fully equipped live/work studios, three studio/research spaces (including one shared living quarters), a large open shed/studio, and outdoor field research areas. Access to most facilities is barrier-free. The Commons, a central gathering building, has a communal kitchen, dining room, fireplace room, an outdoor terrace, and two adjacent spaces for presentations, projects, or dance.

Located at the northwestern edge of the Great Basin in south-central Oregon, PLAYA sits at the base of Winter Ridge, which rises to 7,200 feet. PLAYA’s campus, at an elevation of 4,200 feet, borders Summer Lake to the west and includes a large pond, wetlands, grass fields, and walking paths. Summer Lake is 20 miles long and five miles wide and is defined as a playa, which is a seasonal desert lake, shallow in the winter and spring, and dry in the summer and fall.

Upcoming Deadlines

The Boiler Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)
Indiana Review 1/2 K Prize (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
The Los Angeles Press Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)
The Writer Summer 2019 Flash Fiction Contest (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
PLAYA Art & Science Residency Program (Summer Lake, OR – Deadline August 15)
The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Asian American Literary Review Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Ucross Foundation Residency Program (Ucross, WY – Deadline for Spring 2020 – September 1)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship (Deadline September 17 – $83,000)
Salt Hill Journal Call for Submissions (Deadline September 30)

Boulevard
Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers (Deadline September 30 – $1000)
The Missouri Review Jeffrey E. Smith Editors Award (Deadline October 1 – $5000)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)

Sunday
Jul282019

Submission Sunday 7.28.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The NPR Story Lab Call for Program Pitches

The NPR Story Lab is looking for great ideas. In fact, we’re an idea hub—generating new segments for our news programs, creating radio shows, and launching new podcasts. We want to collaborate with member stations and independent producers. We want to work with new talent that brings a fresh perspective to NPR. We want to keep innovating and leading in the podcast and radio world. The NPR Story Lab is a true creative studio at the heart of NPR, one that fosters experimentation and continues to evolve the sound of public radio. 

NPR is currently accepting applications for new radio shows, podcasts and recurring segments for our news magazine program. Projects can range from being in development to looking for acquisition. We’re searching for ideas that present new voices, explore innovative approaches, and evolve the sound of public radio. We want projects that will appeal to younger and more diverse audiences, and that reflect NPR’s high standards of public service in journalism and cultural expression.


Gold Line Press Chapbook Contests (Deadline August 1 – $500)

Gold Line Press and Ricochet Editions are small presses run by students and alumni of the University of Southern California’s PhD Program in Creative Writing. We seek works of prose that are purposefully planned as chapbooks: novellettes, carefully curated collections of vignettes, short stories, essays, or other projects that take the chapbook format as an instrumental element of their design.

This year’s chapbook judges are Bhanu Kapil (nonfiction), Diana Khoi Nguyen (poetry), and Myriam Gurba (fiction). In January 2020, we will announce contest results by email, as well as on the Gold Line Press site. The winning chapbooks will be published in the fall of that year. Each winner receives $500, publication of her/his perfect-bound chapbook with ISBN, and 10 contributor copies. Gold Line Press sends out 30 copies on behalf of winners to respected literary venues for review.


The Rumpus Call for Submissions (Deadlines July 31 + August 31)

We know how easy it is to find pop culture on the Internet, so we’re here to give you something more challenging, to show you how beautiful things are when you step off the beaten path. The Rumpus is a place where people come to be themselves through their writing, to tell their stories or speak their minds in the most artful and authentic way they know how. We strive to be a platform for marginalized voices and writing that might not find a home elsewhere. We want to shine a light on stories that build bridges, tear down walls, and speak truth to power. Original fiction and poetry accepted through July 31.

This October, we’ll be exploring the theme, "On Monsters." We want to hear about your monsters. Who or what are they? How have you defeated or tamed or reconsidered them? What does it mean to be monstrous yourself? What are you afraid of in the middle of the night, and how do you manage that fear? What makes a monster? Please submit completed essays between 1500–4000 words by August 31.

Indiana Review 1/2 K Prize (Deadline August 15 – $1000)

Any genre for this contest! Each piece should be 500 words or fewer. Founded in 1976, Indiana Review is a non-profit literary magazine dedicated to showcasing the talents of emerging and established writers. Our mission is to offer the highest quality writing within a wide aesthetic.

As a biannual literary review, IR considers previously unpublished fiction, poetry, essays, and art. IR is edited and managed by Indiana University graduate students and funded mainly by subscriptions, grants, and partial university support.


Tin House YA Fiction Workshop Scholarship
(Newport, OR – November 1-4 – Deadline August 7)

This weekend workshop combines the rugged beauty of the Oregon Coast with a weekend immersed in crafting young adult fiction. The program consists of morning workshops with no more than six writers per class, one-on-one meetings with faculty, afternoon craft discussions, and/or generative exercises. Evenings are reserved for conversations by the fire and coastal revelry.

The YA Fiction Workshop is held at the Sylvia Beach Hotel. Located in the Nye Beach district of Newport, OR, the property sits on a 45-foot bluff overlooking the Pacific, with coastal panoramas that include the famed Yaquina Head Lighthouse. A true hotel for book lovers, the Sylvia Beach Hotel offers 21 literary-themed rooms. 

We will be awarding one general scholarship for our 2019 YA Fiction Workshop. A general scholarship includes both tuition and housing + a $100 food stipend. The scholarship recipient will need to provide for their transportation to and from Portland.


Fairy Tale Review Call for Submissions (The Coral Issue – Deadline July 31)

Fairy Tale Review is a literary journal dedicated to publishing new, inclusive, and innovative fairy-tale prose and poetry. Founded in 2005 by Kate Bernheimer, Fairy Tale Review is dedicated to publishing new fairy tales and to helping raise public awareness of fairy tales as a diverse, innovative art form. Work from Fairy Tale Review has been selected for inclusion in The O. Henry Prize Stories Anthology, Best New American Voices, Best American Fantasy, and listed as “Notable” in Best American Short Stories, among other honors.

Fairy Tale Review will be accepting submissions for our sixteenth print issue, The Coral Issue, from March 27, 2019 to July 31, 2019. The Coral Issue will not be themed. However, we invite with special interest environmental fiction, poetry, and essays. Flora and fauna, weather and aura, and so forth.


Columbia Journal
Fall 2019 Contest
(Deadline August 1 – $250)

The Columbia Journal Online Editors are delighted to officially announce that the Columbia Journal Fall Contest is now open for submissions in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and, for the first time, art. Our judges will be Akil Kumarasamy (fiction), Monica Sok (poetry), Emily Bernard (nonfiction), and Helena Anrather (art). The four winners of the Fall Contest will be published online on columbiajournal.org and will receive a cash prize of $250 each. At least three finalists will be selected and announced in each of the four genres in the fall.

Columbia Journal was founded in 1977 by students in the Columbia University School of the Arts Graduate Writing program. Since then, we’ve featured work from Nobel laureates and unknowns, National Book Award winners and newcomers. Our past issues have included everyone from Raymond Carver to Lorrie Moore, Kara Walker, Sharon Olds, Mary Karr, and Joyce Carol Oates. Today, Columbia Journal publishes in print and online, seeking to showcase the best poetry, nonfiction, fiction, translation and visual art on both platforms.


Willapa Bay Artist in Residency Program (Oysterville, WA – Deadline July 31)

Willapa Bay AiR, situated on 16 acres in coastal southwest Washington state, launched its residency program in March 2014. The Residency has been specifically designed, from the site selection to the architecturally specific building concepts, layouts, and materials, to combine the opportunity for solitude with the opportunity for daily community that fosters creative endeavor.

We offer month-long, self-directed residencies to emerging and established artists, writers, scholars, singer/songwriters, and musical composers. The Residency provides lodging, meals, and work space, at no cost, to six residents each month from March 1 through September 30 of the year. Applications are evaluated by selection committees comprised of working artists and professionals in the applicants' respective fields of discipline.



Upcoming Deadlines


The Jericho Fellowship Prizes (Venice, Italy – Deadline July 30 – £8000)
CRAFT First Chapters Contest (Deadline July 31 – $2000)
The Rumpus Call for Submissions (Deadlines July 31 + August 31)
The Collagist (Now The Rupture!) Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)
The Sewanee Review Fiction & Poetry Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)
Fairy Tale Review Call for Submissions (The Coral Issue – Deadline July 31)
Willapa Bay Artist in Residency Program (Oysterville, WA – Deadline July 31)
Crazyhorse Crazyshorts! Short-Short Fiction Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)
Gold Line Press Chapbook Contests (Deadline August 1 – $500)
Columbia Journal
Fall 2019 Contest
(Deadline August 1 – $250)
2020 PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline August 1)
Cutthroat Call for Submissions (Anthology of Contemporary Chicanx Writers – Deadline August 1)
Tin House YA Fiction Workshop Scholarship (Newport, OR – November 1-4 – Deadline August 7)
The Boiler Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)
Indiana Review 1/2 K Prize (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship (Deadline September 17 – $83,000)
Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)

Sunday
Jul142019

Submission Sunday 7.14.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship
(Deadline September 17 – $83,000)

The Hodder Fellowship will be given to artists of exceptional promise to pursue independent projects at Princeton University during the 2020-2021 academic year. Potential Hodder Fellows are composers, choreographers, performance artists, visual artists, writers or other kinds of artists or humanists who have "much more than ordinary intellectual and literary gifts"; they are selected more "for promise than for performance." Given the strength of the applicant pool, most successful Fellows have published a first book or have similar achievements in their own fields; the Hodder is designed to provide Fellows with the "studious leisure" to undertake significant new work.

Hodder Fellows spend an academic year at Princeton, but no formal teaching is involved. An $83,000 stipend is provided for this 10-month appointment as a Visiting Fellow. Fellowships are not intended to fund work leading to an advanced degree. One need not be a U.S. citizen to apply.


The Boiler Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)

The Boiler publishes new and emerging writers on a quarterly basis. We’re hungry for your best stuff. We’re advocates of the writing we publish. Give us something to talk about.

The Boiler began in 2011 by a group of writers at Sarah Lawrence College. We are an online quarterly that publishes fresh and lively works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction from emerging and established authors. We like work that turns up the heat, whistles, and stands up to pressure. Recent authors published include Eloisa Amezcua, Mai Der Vang, Chelsea Dingman, Cortney Lamar Charleston, Kayla Rae Candrilli, Zach VandeZande, Julie Marie Wade, Tatiana Ryckman, and others. We nominate writers for Best of the Net, The Pushcart Prize, and other awards. Poems published in The Boiler have been featured in Bettering American Poetry, Best of the Net, HTML Giant, Coldfront Magazine, Verse Daily, and elsewhere.

Atticus Review Flash Creative Nonfiction Contest (Deadline July 21 – $400)

Atticus Review is happy to announce our second annual Flash Creative Nonfiction Contest, this year judged by Ira Sukrungruang. Atticus Review is a daily online journal that publishes fiction, poems, and creative nonfiction, as well as graphic art, mixed media, music essays, and, on occasion, blog posts, interviews, and non-traditional book reviews. We have been publishing great work since 2011 and have had over 1200 contributors. 

The writing in Atticus Review is unashamed, unadorned, and unafraid. We want our contributors to dig deep into wounds to uncover words that touch the heart of the heartache — not to wallow, but rather to transcend despair through art and arrive at something hopeful. The stories we love are often lonely, and sometimes ugly, but we’re also deeply attracted to the bright, bold, and hope-infused.

We like hybrid, unconventional work that pushes boundaries, elevates and edifies on an intellectual level, that investigates the inscrutable essence of a thing, that avoids artifice to stand firmly in its unique voice. We are a platform, but not a pulpit. Moralizing is best kept at Sunday School. Judgement is best kept in court.


Cutthroat
Call for Submissions (Anthology of Contemporary Chicanx Writers – Deadline August 1)

We are delighted to announce our collaboration with Black Earth Institute on the publication of a major anthology of contemporary Chicanx writers. Editors: Luis Alberto Urrea, Matt Mendez, Beth Alvarado, Carmen Tafolla, Octavio Quintanilla, Theresa Acevedo, Denise Chavez and Edward Vidaurre!

For this anthology, we are looking for Chicanx writers, from the rasquache to the refined. We want writing that goes deep into the culture and reveals our heritage in new ways. We want experiences, from blue collar gigs to going into higher education and pursuing PhDs. We want work that challenges. That is irreverent. That is both defiant and inventive. That is well-crafted. That is puro Chicanx. Send your best writing.


Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)

The American poet Amy Lowell died in 1925. Her will established an annual scholarship to support travel abroad for gifted American-born poets. The scholarship is administered by the Trustees under her will at the law firm of Choate, Hall & Stewart in Boston, Massachusetts. Any poet of American birth who is able and willing to spend one year outside the continent of North America. There is no age requirement, and there is no requirement that applicants be enrolled in a university or other education program. While many recent winners have been published poets, there is no requirement that applicants have previously published their work. The 2020-2021 Scholarship award will be approximately $60,500, adjusted for inflation. If there are two winners, each will receive the full amount.


The Sewanee Review Fiction & Poetry Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)

Submit a short story of up to 10,000 words or a set of 1-3 poems. Judges: Roxane Gay (fiction) and Carl Phillips (poetry). Winners receive $1,000 and publication in the Winter 2020 issue. All contest entrants receive a one-year subscription to the Sewanee Review starting with the Fall 2019 issue.

Founded in 1892 by the teacher and critic William Peterfield Trent, the Sewanee Review is America’s oldest continuously published literary quarterly. Many of the twentieth century’s great writers, including T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Wallace Stevens, Saul Bellow, Katherine Anne Porter, Marianne Moore, and Ezra Pound, have appeared in the magazine. SR also has a long tradition of cultivating emerging talent: we published excerpts of Cormac McCarthy and Flannery O’Connor’s first novels, and the early poetry of Robert Penn Warren, Sylvia Plath, Robert Lowell, and Christian Wiman. “Whatever the new literature turns out to be,” wrote editor Allen Tate in 1944, “it will be the privilege of the Sewanee Review to print its share of it, to comment on it, and to try to understand it.” The mission remains unchanged.


Typishly Call for Submissions

Typishly is an online literary magazine publishing short fiction and poetry submitted by established and emerging writers. When we ask writers why they like Typishly, they talk about three things.

1. Personalized note.
2. One day response.
3. Beautiful design.

Typishly has published poetry and short stories by a founding editor at Vanity Fair, a former TV producer for 60 Minutes, newspaper journalists, an international diplomat, veterans, novelists, university professors, lawyers, medical professionals, teachers, MFA students, professional actors and musicians, visual artists, retirees, homemakers, high school students, an Olympian, and a guy who works in demolition. They live in America, the UK, Italy, Sweden, Australia, Canada and elsewhere.

Every week, Typishly sends out a special call for Emerging Writer Thursdays for writers who have been published three or fewer times, with a Thursday submission deadline. Unpublished newbies are encouraged to submit. Your short story or poetry will be considered along with work submitted by other emerging writers. Emerging Writer Thursdays also give new and emerging writers a break on our regular submission fee. 


The Jericho Fellowship Prizes (Venice, Italy – Deadline July 30 – £8000)

An exciting opportunity for young emerging artists or established practitioners to show case their work on the theme "epiphany," which can be in the form of a single submission or series of pieces. All submissions will be reviewed by the advisory board, and the winner will receive a cash prize of £8000. The winner will be invited to attend the symposium in Venice, Italy from August 22-25 where they will be presented with their prize. Flights and accommodation are included.

The Jericho Fellowship is a four-day gathering around an annual theme that brings together visionary artists, scholars, and thinkers to share time, space, and ideas. Attendees include guests, speakers, and prize winners and are invited privately and individually. Days will be filled with lectures, panels, plays, musical performances, and delicious food! We invite you to be intellectually stimulated by a passionate group of people and come away with new ways of seeing and engaging with the world. To be inspired by special surroundings and a multi-disciplinary approach.


Upcoming Deadlines  
 
Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Awards (Deadline July 15 – $1500)
Annenberg Community Beach House Artist Residency (Santa Monica, CA – Deadline July 18)
Atticus Review Flash Creative Nonfiction Contest (Deadline July 21 – $400)
The Jericho Fellowship Prizes (Venice, Italy – Deadline July 30 – £8000)
CRAFT First Chapters Contest (Deadline July 31 – $2000)
The Collagist (Now The Rupture!) Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)
The Sewanee Review Fiction & Poetry Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)
Crazyhorse Crazyshorts! Short-Short Fiction Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)
2020 PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline August 1)
Cutthroat Call for Submissions (Anthology of Contemporary Chicanx Writers – Deadline August 1)
The Boiler Call for Submissions (Deadline August 15)
The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
The Princeton University Hodder Fellowship (Deadline September 17 – $83,000)
Amy Lowell Traveling  Poetry
Scholarship (Deadline October 15 – $60,500)

Sunday
Jun302019

Submission Sunday 6.30.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


2020 PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline August 1)

The Emerging Voices Fellowship, run out of our Los Angeles office, is a literary mentorship that aims to provide new writers who are isolated from the literary establishment with the tools, skills, and knowledge they need to launch a professional writing career.

By the end of the Emerging Voices Fellowship, a writer will leave with:

  • Seven months of guidance from a professional mentor and written notes on their current writing project.
  • An author photo and bio.
  • A logline—the short summation of the project in progress.
  • A clear action plan for finishing this project.
  • Writing life, and craft tips, from notable visiting authors.
  • An editing guide from a professional copy editor.
  • Insider knowledge of publishing from agents, publishers, and editors.
  • An individualized submission guide for literary journals, agents, residencies, and fellowships.
  • Improved reading technique from a professional voice coach.
  • Public reading experience for a variety of audiences.
  • An understanding of how to be an effective workshop participant.
  • Lifetime membership in PEN America.
  • An introduction to the Los Angeles literary community.

The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July. Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing.


Duende Call for Submissions (The Food Issue – Deadline July 1)

Duende is the all-online literary journal of the BFA in Writing degree-track at Goddard College. We care about you, what you write and who you are. We are looking for authenticity of voice and writing that celebrates lived experience, in all its forms. Duende is committed to having a majority of the writers and artists in our journal come from groups that are underrepresented in today’s U.S. literary ecosystem. That is to say, most of the work we publish will be from writers and artists who are queer, non-binary, of color, disabled, immigrant, working class, youth, elder, and /or otherwise from communities that are too often overlooked by literary gatekeepers. To borrow a phrase from the Goddard College opening ceremony, we welcome you here!

We’re looking for pieces around the theme of “FOOD,” which may include pieces centering on food as who we are, food justice, food systems, the sensuality that is eating, mental health issues around food and eating, cultural importance of food and food rituals, a love/hate relationship with food, how food triggers our good and bad habits, that which brings us together, food as desire, fête, communion/community…to name just a few ways of speaking to the theme. For this issue, we are particularly interested in those voices that often go unheard in the food and restaurant industry. To that end, we welcome submissions in both English and Spanish.

Crazyhorse Crazyshorts! Short-Short Fiction Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)

The 2019 Crazyshorts! Contest will begin accepting entries on July 1st. Submit 1-3 shorts up to 500 words. Founded by the poet Tom McGrath in Los Angeles in 1960, Crazyhorse continues to be one of the finest, most influential literary journals published today. Past contributors include such renowned authors as John Updike, Raymond Carver, Jorie Graham, John Ashbery, Robert Bly, Ha Jin, John Gardner, W. P. Kinsella, Richard Wilbur, James Wright, Carolyn Forché, Charles Simic, Charles Wright, Billy Collins, Galway Kinnell, James Tate and Franz Wright. Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners alike appear regularly in its pages, right alongside Guggenheim fellows, National Endowment for the Arts fellowship recipients, and writers whose work appears in the O. Henry Prize, Pushcart Prize, and Best American anthologies.

Throughout the 1970s, other editors took the helm of the journal, among them Deb and Edith Wylder, who played a key role in the life of Crazyhorse when they brought it to Murray State University in Kentucky, and the journal (with its new, single-word name) began to publish fiction and critical essays along with poetry. Jorie Graham and James Galvin became its poetry editors, Joe Ashby Porter its fiction editor, and the journal found itself one of the most respected in the country.


Richard J. Margolis Nonfiction Writing Award
(Deadline July 1 – $5000)

The Richard J. Margolis Award is given annually to a promising new journalist or essayist whose nonfiction work combines warmth, humor and wisdom and sheds light on issues of social justice. The award honors the life of Richard J. Margolis (1929-1991), a renowned journalist, essayist and poet who gave eloquent voice to the rural poor, migrant farmworkers, Native Americans, aging adults and others whose voices are seldom heard. He also wrote several  books for children. The award combines a one-month residency at Blue Mountain Center, an acclaimed writers' and artists' colony in New York’s Adirondack Mountains, with a $5,000 prize.


Grist Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)

Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts, seeks high quality submissions from both emerging and established writers. We publish craft essays and interviews as well as fiction, nonfiction, and poetry—and we want to see your best work, regardless of form, style, or subject matter. We seek work of high literary quality from both emerging and established writers. We welcome all styles and aesthetic approaches. All that matters to us is quality.

Past issues have included such writers as Dan Albergotti, Dorothy Allison, Ellen Bass, Richard Bausch, Katherine Boo, Maud Casey, May-lee Chai, Peter Ho Davies, Timothy Donnelly, Tom Franklin, Elizabeth Gilbert, Joy Harjo, Lyn Hejinian, Bob Hicok, T.R. Hummer, Adam Johnson, Fady Joudah, Dorianne Laux, Dorothea Lasky, Dana Levin, Julia B. Levine, Lisa Lewis, Thomas Lynch, Khaled Mattawa, Joseph Millar, Ander Monson, Danielle Pafunda, Ron Rash, Hilda Raz, Maggie Smith, Maura Stanton, Michael Steinberg, Virgil Suárez, William Wenthe, and many others.


CRAFT
First Chapters Contest
(Deadline July 31 – $2000)

Awards: $2800 | agent review | manuscript critique
Judged by Naomi Huffman of MCDxFSG and FSG Originals

Excerpts of book-length fiction only—please submit the first chapter or chapters* of your unpublished novels/novellas, completed or in progress. All entrants will receive an exclusive digital compilation next winter that includes: the winning chapters, with Naomi Huffman's introductions and the winners' craft essays; excerpts from the finalist entries; notes from the readers and editors about the reading process; and more.

We explore the art of fiction with a focus on the elements of craft. We feature new and republished fiction, critical pieces on craft, interviews, book annotations, and much more. CRAFT works with all writers, established as well as emerging. We use craft as a focal point and a lens through which to present fiction. Each published work of fiction includes an author’s note which discusses the craft in the story. We love that this gives each writer the opportunity to present an inside look at their work. In some cases, authors speak about the origin of a story. Others write about a specific element, such as point-of-view or the use of time. In every case, we’ve been inspired to reread the story after reading the author’s note, and we hope you will want to do the same!


Callaloo Call for Submissions

Callaloo, the premier journal of literature, art, and culture of the African Diaspora, publishes original work by and about writers and visual artists of African descent worldwide. Recently ranked 13th in Every Writer's Resource's Top 50 Literary Magazines, Callaloo offers an engaging mixture of fiction, poetry, critical articles, interviews, drama, and visual art. Frequent annotated bibliographies, special issues dedicated to major writers and literary, social, and cultural themes, and full-color, original artwork and photography are some of the features of this highly acclaimed international showcase of arts and letters.


Bitch Media Writing Fellowships
(Deadline June 30)

The fellowships were created in order to cultivate and amplify new voices. If you are a writer who has minimal publication experience, we strongly encourage you to apply. If you are passionate about one of the above subject areas but do not have a history of writing or blogging about them, we strongly encourage you to apply. If you are a writer still figuring out what subjects obsess you, we strongly encourage you to apply.

Bitch Media seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex, intersectional arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world. We are independent, we are feminist. We believe in pop culture as a valuable, dynamic site and we do not shy away from the rich and productive tensions that arise when analyzing and critiquing it through a feminist lens.

We’re pleased to announce that the Bitch Media Fellowships for Writers applications are now open! A series of three-month intensive writing fellowships, the goal is to develop, support, and amplify emerging, diverse voices in feminist, activist, and pop-culture media. All fellows will work under the guidance of Bitch cofounder Andi Zeisler.

 

Upcoming Deadlines  

Bitch Media Writing Fellowships
(Deadline June 30) 

The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)
The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize
(Theme: The Circus – Deadline June 30)
The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)
Duende Call for Submissions (The Food Issue – Deadline July 1)
Richard J. Margolis Nonfiction Writing Award (Deadline July 1 – $5000)
Rattle Poetry Prize (Deadline July 15 – $10,000)
Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Awards (Deadline July 15 – $1500)
Annenberg Community Beach House Artist Residency (Santa Monica, CA – Deadline July 18)
CRAFT First Chapters Contest (Deadline July 31 – $2000)
The Collagist (Now The Rupture!) Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)
Crazyhorse Crazyshorts! Short-Short Fiction Contest (Deadline July 31 – $1000)
2020 PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline August 1)
The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)
Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline September 15)
 

Sunday
Jun162019

Submission Sunday 6.16.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The Feminist Press Louise Meriwether First Book Prize (Deadline June 28)

The prize was founded in 2016 to honor author Louise Meriwether by publishing a debut work by a woman or nonbinary author of color, between 30,000 and 80,000 words. The prize is granted to a manuscript that follows in the tradition of Meriwether’s Daddy Was a Number Runner, one of the first contemporary American novels featuring a young Black girl as the protagonist. Meriwether’s groundbreaking text inspired the careers of writers like Jacqueline Woodson and Bridgett M. Davis, among many others. The prize continues this legacy of telling much-needed stories that shift culture and inspire new writers.

One winner will be awarded a $5,000 advance (half at the time of the initial award and half upon publication) and a contract to publish their book with the Feminist Press in print and digital editions in spring 2021. We expect to work closely with the winner and provide editorial guidance on their manuscript. The Louise Meriwether First Book Prize is open to fiction and narrative nonfiction by women of color and nonbinary writers of color. We do not accept poetry, plays, or academic texts.


The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)

The 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose is now open to flash fiction, prose poems, and micro-essays of 500 words or fewer. Established in 2008, the contest awards its winner $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions will receive $250, and all entries will be considered for paid publication on our website as Online Exclusives. This year's Barthelme Prize will be judged by Ben Marcus. 

Begun by Donald Barthelme and Phillip Lopate, Gulf Coast is a nationally distributed journal housed within the University of Houston's English Department, home to one of the US's top ranked creative writing programs. The journal has since moved beyond the student body of the University of Houston and into the larger world. Our readership of the print journal currently exceeds 3,000, with more and more coming to our ever-expanding website. The print journal comes out each April and October.


Contra Viento Call for Submissions

Contra Viento is a journal for art and literature that seeks to understand rangelands in all their varied forms. Rangelands are the tundra and the steppe, the prairie and the plains, the shrubland, the savanna, and the desert. These places are defined by their scale: rangelands are vast. And they are defined by what they often lack: water, people, and popular resources. Rangelands exist where humans have yet to build, where forests have receded and crops do not encroach. According to most estimates, they encompass between one-third and one-half of the ice-free land on earth.

Historically, these are sites of biblical importance, of wars, migrations, escapes, and reinventions. In the United States, rangelands are home to both the West and Mythic West, to manifest destiny and mirage. These places are home to the working cowboy and the cowboy of Hollywood, as well as the Basque, the Vaquero, the Native American, and others. Despite the challenges imposed by such massive and marginal spaces, humans on rangelands have survived in distinctive fashion. For many of today’s inhabitants, the herding of livestock remains a fundamental practice for creating meaning and ensuring livelihood. 

Contra Viento invites writers and artists to submit work that investigates these themes and imagines them anew. Contra Viento publishes work by and for a wide-ranging audience. We are especially interested in submissions from writers and artists historically underrepresented on rangelands, and in projects with specific focus on grazing cultures. We encourage submissions that examine the boundaries between space and place, between land and landscape, between past and future, between somewhere and nowhere, between human and animal, between human and human.

Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)

Poetry Judge: Tommy Pico
Fiction Judge: Rivers Solomon
Nonfiction Judge: Selah Saterstrom
Flash Judge: Vi Khi Nao

Winners in Nonfiction, Fiction, and Poetry genre receive $1500 and publication in BWR 46.2, our Winter/ Spring 2019 issue. Two runner-ups in each genre receive monetary compensation and acknowledgment in that issue. We may consider any submission for general publication. The winner in Flash receives $800 and publication in BWR 46.2, our Winter/Spring 2019 issue. Two runner-ups receive monetary compensation and online publication. We may consider any submission for general publication.

Established in 1974 by graduate students in the MFA Program in Creative WritingBlack Warrior Review is named for the river that borders the campus of The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. The city, the river, and the magazine all derive their names from a sixteenth-century Native American chief Tuskaloosa (also spelled “Tushkalusa”), whose name comes from two words of Creek or Choctaw origin—tasca, meaning “warriors,” and lusa, meaning “black.” In 1540, Chief Tuskaloosa battled the Spanish explorer de Soto at Mabila, a fortified Native American settlement approximately one hundred miles north of present-day Mobile. Chief Tuskaloosa is thought to have been among those who perished. BWR publishes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, comics, and art twice a year.


Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions
(Deadline August 31)

Spilled Milk Magazine is an online literary magazine for fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art, and all things in-between. We are eager to publish work that surprises us—that disregards boundaries and borders. Spilled Milk strives to be a home from unheard voices.

The work that we like pushes the boundaries of our expectations and takes us into a mental place that we have never imagined, yet feel as though it were written specifically for us. We’ve noticed in our brief time of running this magazine that many authors don’t push their work as far as they could. In that, they have the beginnings or inklings of something very adventurous and innovative but then shield away from the precipice. We encourage writers submitting to us to hang out in those weird rooms they’re drawn to and keep digging.


PayPal/Merriam-Webster Haiku That Can Pay You (Deadline June 18 – $1000)

First place: $1,000
Second place: $500
Third place: $250

You booked the big family trip. Congrats!
Got concert tickets for you and your friends. Great!
Now comes the hard part: dealing with all that cash (or worse, a check).
Luckily, big expenses don't have to be a hassle. 
Share your funniest story or best idea about splitting a big expense in a haiku and you could win $1,000*!


Hobart
Call for Submissions

Hobart was founded in 2001 by Aaron Burch. Initially, Hobart was a web journal, coedited by Mike McGowan. In 2002, Aaron expanded Hobart to include an annual print issue in addition to the website. In 2005, Elizabeth Ellen came on as a coeditor of the print journal. Web editors over the years have included Matt Bell, Jensen Beach, Elle Nash, Jac Jemc, Caleb Curtiss, Andrea Kneeland, Ben Gross, Brandi Wells, Matthew Simmons, and Elizabeth Ellen, among others. Stories and essays from the website and print journal have frequently appeared in such compilations as O’Henry, Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best American Essays and Best American Short Stories, with Roxane Gay’s story “North Country” and Mike Meginnis’s story “Navigators” both from Hobart 12 featured in BASS in 2012.

Over the last fifteen years, Hobart has been a home for up and coming writers (and for some a first publication!) such as Stephany Aulenback, Lauren Groff, Blake Butler, Stephen Elliott, Mary Miller, Claire Vaye Watkins, Amelia Gray, Lindsay Hunter, Tao Lin, Maile Chapman, Matt Bell, Jac Jemc, Jeff Parker, Brian Allen Carr, Tod Goldberg, Paul Crenshaw, Melinda Moutzakis, and Lydia Conklin. In 2006, Elizabeth Ellen founded the book division, Short Flight / Long Drive Books, which has published books of poetry, fiction and nonfiction by Michelle Orange, Mary Miller, Adam Novy, Karl Taro Greenfeld, Jess Stoner, Chelsea Martin, Mira Gonzalez, Tao Lin, Uzodinma Okehi, Elizabeth Ellen and Chloe Caldwell. In 2018, SF/LD will publish a poetry collection by Jason Phoebe Rusch.


Annenberg Community Beach House Artist Residency
(Santa Monica, CA – Deadline July 18)

Santa Monica Cultural Affairs seeks applications from writers of fiction, poetry, and plays who reside in Los Angeles County for an Artist Residency at the Annenberg Community Beach House at 415 Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Monica. In celebration of Marion Davies’ support of artists, and to further the work of local artists, the City of Santa Monica has established a residency program at the Beach House that rotates between various artistic disciplines. The Writer Residency Program offers writers a private office at the Beach House for nine weeks to complete a work-in-progress. Two terms are available, with one resident chosen for each term.

The City provides this opportunity to writers who need a place to write and are interested in sharing aspects of their work for the public’s benefit. This program is best suited to writers who will be able to use the residency period to either finish or make significant progress on a particular work. As an acknowledgement of the public benefit of the resident to the community, an honorarium of $1,500 is paid in monthly installments to each resident.

 

Upcoming Deadlines  

PayPal/Merriam-Webster Haiku That Can Pay You (Deadline June 18 – $1000)
The Feminist Press Louise Meriwether First Book Prize (Deadline June 28)

The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)
The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize
(Theme: The Circus – Deadline June 30)
The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)
Rattle Poetry Prize (Deadline July 15 – $10,000)
Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Awards (Deadline July 15 – $1500)
Annenberg Community Beach House Artist Residency (Santa Monica, CA – Deadline July 18)
The Collagist (Now The Rupture! ) Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)
The Gulf Coast 2019 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose (Deadline August 15 – $1000)
Spilled Milk Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline August 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
Black Warrior Review 2019 Contest (Deadline September 1 – $800-$1500)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)

Sunday
Jun022019

Submission Sunday 6.2.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

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American Short Fiction Halifax Ranch Prize (Deadline June 15 – $2500)

American Short Fiction's first ever Halifax Ranch Prize for Fiction opened on April 1. We are honored to have Rebecca Makkai as our guest judge. The winner will receive a $2,500 prize and publication in an upcoming issue of American Short Fiction.

Issued triannually, American Short Fiction publishes work by emerging and established voices: stories that dive into the wreck, that stretch the reader between recognition and surprise, that conjure a particular world with delicate expertise—stories that take a different way home. Stories published by American Short Fiction are anthologized in Best American Short Stories, Best American Non-Required Reading, The O. Henry Prize Stories, and The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses, and elsewhere.

American Short Fiction was founded by Laura Furman at the University of Texas Press and in cooperation with the Texas Center for Writers and “The Sound of Writing” broadcast on National Public Radio. It quickly gained a national reputation for first-rate fiction. During its initial run, from 1991 to 1998, the magazine was a two-time finalist for the National Magazine Award for Fiction. In 2006, American Short Fiction resumed publication under the guidance of the good people at Badgerdog Literary Publishing, Inc., where it continued its award-winning record, most recently in the hands of the talented Jill Meyers. American Short Fiction is now published by American Short Fiction, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit, and is based in Austin, Texas.

Guernica Call for Submissions

Founded online in 2004, Guernica is an award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit magazine focused on the intersection of arts and politics. Run entirely by a staff of volunteers, Guernica is also the grateful recipient of federal and private support. A home for incisive ideas and necessary questions, we publish memoir, reporting, interviews, commentary, poetry, fiction, and multimedia journalism exploring identity, conflict, culture, justice, science, and beyond. With contributors from every continent and at every stage of their careers, we are proud to feature singular perspectives on the critical issues facing our world today. Guernica welcomes submissions from writers and visual artists at all stages of their careers.


Rattle Poetry Prize (Deadline July 15 – $10,000)

Rattle’s mission is to promote the practice of poetry. We feel that poetry lost its way in the 20th century, to the point that mainstream readers have forgotten how moving language alone can be. As a result, most people learn to find their feelings in music, movies, and novels, while poetry languishes on its lone shelf in the bookstores, waiting only for the occasional cameo at a university workshop.

But it shouldn’t take a scholar to be moved by the written word—great literature has something to offer everyone. All our lives are compelling, full of joys and burdens and profound experiences we should be sharing—and poetry is the most intimate way to share it. When you read a poem, you become the medium; the poet speaks in your voice, paints the canvas of your inner eye.

This connection is more direct than any other, and it doesn’t take a Hollywood budget to do it. Read the poems on Rattle.com for free. Write a poem on a napkin and share it with a friend. Keep a journal and send us a page. Participate. The pure love of language is one of the most important experiences in the history of human culture, and somehow most of us have forgotten about it.


The Collagist Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)

The Collagist is published once every two months. Each issue features original fiction, poetry, and essays, most of which have been selected from unsolicited submissions. The Collagist published its first issue in August 2009 under the editorship of founding editor Matt Bell. Work first published in The Collagist has been featured in Best American Poetry, the Pushcart Prize anthology, Best New Poets, Best of the Net, Best Small Fictions, the Wigleaf top 50, and by Longform and other publications.


Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Awards (Deadline July 15 – $1500)

Seeking fiction and creative nonfiction in any genre. This year’s judge is Carmen Maria Machado, author of Her Body and Other Parties. You do not need to be from or associated with New Mexico or Santa Fe. We publish a wide range of books from authors who live all around the world, and are globally distributed by the Independent Publishers Group.

What are we looking for? All fiction and creative nonfiction will be eligible despite genre, form, subject, or length. So we'll take full-length manuscripts, collections short or long, excerpts, and essays. We don't care about what the big presses believe to be "marketable," we want to see excellence in writing, no matter the form it takes. Past winners have ranged from flash fiction to memoir to magical realism to literary fiction to essays.


Barren Magazine Call for Submissions

An Alt.Lit Introspective.

Barren Magazine is a literary publication that features fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and photography for hard truths, long stares, and gritty lenses. We revel in the shadow-spaces that make up the human condition, and aim to find antitheses to that which defines us: light in darkness; beauty in ugliness; peace in disarray. We invite you to explore it with us.

Barren Magazine accepts flash fiction, short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction about the complexities of the human condition. We also accept photography — all images in Barren Magazine are original. Please read our current issue to get an idea of what catches our eye.


Salamander 2019 Fiction Contest (Deadline June 3 – $1000)

Final Judge: Wayétu Moore

Salamander is a literary organization that publishes a biannual magazine of poetry, fiction, memoir, and works in translation. It was founded by Jennifer Barber in 1992 with the aim of publishing a generation of writers reaching artistic maturity and deserving of a wider audience alongside new work by established writers. In addition to the magazine, Salamander sponsors events and readings in the Boston area and in New York. Salamander came to Suffolk University in the fall of 2005 and receives ongoing support from the University. Housed in and published from Suffolk's English Department at 73 Tremont Street in Boston, it is distributed nationally. Its annual fiction contest, judged by prominent short story writers and novelists, began in 2010.


Vermont Studio Center Fellowships (Johnson, Vermont – Deadline June 15)

Twenty-five (25) VSC fellowships open to ALL artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world. All applicants will be automatically considered for one of these twenty-five unrestricted awards. These awards are for residencies scheduled between September 2019 and May 2020. Every VSC residency opportunity includes private room, private studio space, all meals, and full access to our schedule of evening programs and events.

The Vermont Studio Center was founded by artists in 1984. Our location—situated along the banks of the Gihon River in the historic village of Johnson, Vermont—was chosen with the intention of fostering creativity through community, collaboration, and quiet reflection supported by the unspoiled beauty of the northern Green Mountains. Over the last 30 years, VSC has grown to become the largest international artists' and writers' residency program in the United States. Our mission is to provide studio residencies in an inclusive, international community, honoring creative work as the communication of spirit through form.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   
 
Salamander 2019 Fiction Contest (Deadline June 3 – $1000)
PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship (Deadline June 3)

Backbone Press Lucille Clifton Poetry Prize (Deadline June 15 – $500)
American Short Fiction Halifax Ranch Prize (Deadline June 15 – $2500)
Vermont Studio Center Fellowships (Johnson, Vermont – Deadline June 15)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)
The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize
(Theme: The Circus – Deadline June 30)
The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)
Rattle Poetry Prize (Deadline July 15 – $10,000)
Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Awards (Deadline July 15 – $1500)
The Collagist Call for Submissions
(Deadline July 31)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)

Sunday
May192019

Submission Sunday 5.19.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


NBC Universal Writers on the Verge Program (Deadline May 31)

Writers on the Verge is a program focused on polishing writers and readying them for a staff writer position on a television series. We are looking for writers who are “almost there” but need that final bit of preparation with their writing and personal presentation skills. We particularly encourage writers of diverse backgrounds to apply. The program will consist of weekly evening classes at NBCUniversal in Universal City, CA. Once accepted, students must attend all classes and turn in all written assignments.

Classes concentrate on creating exceptional material to enhance their portfolio, and understanding the dynamics of pitching oneself in the television industry. Writers are given the chance to interact with industry players ranging from network executives to show runners to agents and receive valuable feedback on their work and pitch style. Writing assignments on a NBCUniversal television show may be available after successful completion of the program but are not a guarantee. Past participants have gone on to series including “The Blacklist,” “Marlon,” “Community”, “Burn Notice”, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”, “White Collar”, “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”, “Chicago Fire” and “Parenthood.”


Granta Magazine
Call for Submissions (Deadline May 28)

From Nobel laureates to debut novelists, international translations to investigative journalism, each themed issue of Granta turns the attention of the world’s best writers on to one aspect of the way we live now. Granta does not have a political or literary manifesto, but it does have a belief in the power and urgency of the story and its supreme ability to describe, illuminate and make real.

Granta magazine was founded in 1889 by students at Cambridge University as The Granta, a periodical of student politics, badinage and literary enterprise, named after the river that runs through the town. In this original incarnation it published the work of writers like A.A. Milne, Michael Frayn, Stevie Smith, Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. In 1979, Bill Buford transformed Granta from a student publication to the literary quarterly it remains today. Granta Books came ten years later, quickly becoming one of the most independent-minded and prestigious literary publishers in the UK.

Granta’s Best of Young issues, released decade by decade, introduce the most important voices of each generation – in Britain, America, Brazil and Spain – and have been defining the contours of the literary landscape since 1983. As the Observer writes: ‘In its blend of memoirs and photojournalism, and in its championing of contemporary realist fiction, Granta has its face pressed firmly against the window, determined to witness the world.’


The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize
(Theme: The Circus – Deadline June 30)

The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize is now open for submissions! Until the closing date of June 30, 2019, we invite entries on the theme “The Circus” from both published and unpublished writers resident anywhere in the world. Up for grabs is a one-month residency in a luxury apartment in one of the world’s most creative destinations for travellers, Berlin’s Circus Hotel. From January 4th to February 3rd 2020, the winning author will have a month to write, a free four-day pass to The British Council Germany’s Literary Seminar, and access to the famously inspiring Berliner Luft!

Alongside a host of runner up prizes, a shortlist of ten writers will be published in an anthology by the independent Berlin press KLAK Verlag. Last time, our 2017 shortlist featured both unpublished writers and debut novelists, including two who went on to be longlisted for The Booker Prize in 2018. We’ve already had requests from literary agents to view our next longlist. All of which meaning that if you are an emerging writer, our competition is one you should seriously consider entering.


3Elements Literary Review Call for Submissions
(Dumbwaiter, Shore, Sigil – Deadline May 31)

3Elements Literary Review is an independent literary journal publishing digitally once every quarter. Our issue is produced in PDF format. Each issue begins with the posting of three elements (which are currently Dumbwaiter, Shore, Sigil), and ends with a journal filled with the imaginative ways in which each writer and artist transformed those elements. Our journal is uniquely designed and filled with literature that is thoughtfully crafted. We pride ourselves on publishing contributors from all around the globe. We just might be the best online literary magazine you’ve never heard of.


[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)

We are pleased to announce the inaugural [PANK] Books Contest! One Grand Prize Winner in Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction Full Length Books Contest will each receive:

  • $1000 Grand Prize
  • $500 Publicity Campaign
  • Invitation to Book Launch, Signing and Reading at AWP 2020
  • Invitation to New York City Book Reading
  • 25 Author Copies
  • Will Serve as the 2020 [PANK] Books Contest Judge
  • We will also consider runners–up for publication!

Send us your innovations, your silenced voices, your open hearts, your caged birds, your truths, your beauty, your everythings. PANK fosters access to emerging and experimental poetry and prose, publishing the brightest and most promising writers for the most adventurous readers. PANK loves you. PANK is always open for your love. We hope you’ll share your writing with PANK. Since we are not a paying venue, we understand if you cannot, but we hope you will. We’re invested in sharp, honest, beautiful writing. Strangeness is a small god.


The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions
(Deadline September 1)
 

The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought originated late one evening in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago. We were interested in the conversations that could arise when an account was paired with creative work. We imagined a journal where writers could offer such accounts beside their poems and prose, and where artists could offer the same pairing of work and aesthetic statement.

account =  history, sketch, marker, repository of influences

An account of a specific work traces its arc—through texts and world—while giving voice to the artist’s approach. The literary/art market’s tidal wave can tend to engulf the maker’s account of the work. We believe that an account can restore the relationship between artist and aesthetic. The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought encourages writers to submit work of any aesthetic. All work must be submitted with an account. Our writers have won the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net.


The Masters Review Flash Fiction Contest
(Deadline May 31 – $3000)

The Masters Review is an online and in print publication celebrating new and emerging writers. We are on the lookout for the best new talent with hopes of publishing stories from writers who will continue to produce great work. We offer critical essays, book reviews by debut authors, contest deadlines, submissions info, and interviews with established authors, all with the hopes of bridging the gap between new and established writers.

The winning writer will be awarded $3000 and publication in The Masters Review. Second and third place will be awarded $300 and $200, respectively, as well as publication in The Masters Review. All three finalists will earn a spot in Kathy Fish’s Fast Flash© online workshop. So here it is: a home for your very best small fiction.


KCRW Report LA Fellowship
(Deadline May 31)

KCRW is committed to serving and representing all communities of Southern California. We are excited to launch our new KCRW Report LA Fellowship which aims to diversify the public media newsroom by training and funding two budding journalists from historically underrepresented groups for one year.

By removing barriers that impede entry into the public media newsroom, we hope to find enthusiastic people of all backgrounds who stay up on the news, demonstrate knowledge of Southern California, have some experience (college media accepted) and are pursuing a career in media.

Here’s what we offer: This is a paid full-time, 12-month fellowship that begins in mid June 2019 and ends May 31, 2020. Benefits are included, as well as placement assistance at the end of the term. The position is based at KCRW in Santa Monica.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   
 
New Letters Conger Beasley Jr. Award for Nonfiction, Patricia Cleary Miller Award for Poetry, and Robert Day Award for Fiction (Deadline May 20 – $2500)
Ploughshares Emerging Writer's Contest (Deadline May 22 – $2000)
Granta Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline May 28)
AGNI Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)
KCRW Report LA Fellowship (Deadline May 31)
The Baltimore Review Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)
NBC Universal Writers on the Verge Program (Deadline May 31)
The Masters Review Flash Fiction Contest (Deadline May 31 – $3000)
3Elements Literary Review Call for Submissions (Dumbwaiter, Shore, Sigil – Deadline May 31)
Geometry Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
Contrary Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
Boulevard Poetry Contest for Emerging Poets (Deadline June 1 – $1000)
PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship (Deadline June 3)
Backbone Press Lucille Clifton Poetry Prize (Deadline June 15 – $500)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)
The 2019 Berlin Writing Prize
(Theme: The Circus – Deadline June 30)
The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)
[PANK] 2019 Big Book Contest (Deadline September 1 – $1000)
The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought Call for Submissions (Deadline September 1)

Sunday
May052019

Submission Sunday 5.5.19

 

Typewriters (Paper) by Zehra Khan


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)

The Los Angeles Review, an annual print and online literary journal established in 2003, is the voice of Los Angeles, and the voice of the nation. With its multitude of cultures, Los Angeles roils at the center of the cauldron of divergent literature emerging from the West Coast. Perhaps from this place something can emerge that speaks to the writer or singer or dancer or wild person in all of us, something disturbing, something alive, something of the possibility of what it could be to be human in the 21st century.

Prizes include a $1000 honorarium and publication via LAR Online and in the best-of annual print edition of the Los Angeles Review, issue no. 24, set to be released in 2020. Matty Layne Glasgow will judge in poetry, Tammy Lynne Stoner will judge in fiction, Brittany Ackerman will judge in flash fiction, and Adrianne Kalfopoulou will judge in nonfiction.


Gay Magazine Call for Submissions and Pitches (Chapter 1: Pleasure – Deadline May 17)

Gay is a new publication partnership between Roxane Gay and Medium. Laura June Topolsky is the Deputy Editor and Kaitlyn Adams serves as Managing Editor. We will be publishing work weekly, covering a wide variety of topics. We will also assemble ambitious, compelling quarterly themed issues. We are now accepting submissions, on a rolling basis, and look forward to hearing from new and established writers who possess original voices. Gay will offer some of the most interesting and thoughtful cultural criticism to be found on the Web. We are interested in deep explorations, timelessness, and challenging conventional thinking without being cheap and lazy.

Chapter 1: Pleasure. What pleases you or brings you pleasure? Is it good for you, or not? Does it matter and how much does it matter? Is pleasure more or less valuable to you in the face of broad, generalized political unrest? How do we allow ourselves to enjoy and revel in pleasure? We seek pieces ranging from around 1,200 to about 3,500 words. But what pleases *us* most is quality, so we’re not going to focus unduly on length.


American Chordata Call for Submissions (Deadline May 15)

American Chordata seeks short works of original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and translation. We have no formal word limits or stylistic constraints but look for work that is brave, illuminating, and emotionally detailed.

American Chordata is a biannual literary and arts magazine that's beautiful to look at; packed with bright voices in fiction, essay, poetry, art, and photography; and curated by weirdos who love brave new writing as much as you do. Each issue of American Chordata is published both online and in print.


Geometry Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)

Geometry is an international literary endeavour. We seek to publish outstanding literature from our home country, Aotearoa New Zealand, and from around the world. We are a digital and print publication dedicated to featuring work by both established and emerging writers. We place no limitations on style or content. Our criterion is distinctive and intelligent writing. We seek fresh voices. We seek diversity. We seek work that captivates and challenges. Geometry accepts submissions of literary fiction, nonfiction, graphic narrative, art and poetry.


Backbone Press Lucille Clifton Poetry Prize (Deadline June 15 – $500)

The Lucille Clifton annual poetry contest, held each spring, honors the prolific work of the late poet great. Widely celebrated for her unpretentious and unapologetic poems, Clifton’s unique free verse was free of punctuation, taut, and always recognizably her.

Backbone Press has been publishing diversely since 2012. We debut and support writers who are considered marginalized voices and whose work may not be published elsewhere. Our press was started as a response to the bleak state of diversity in publishing. We believe, in art, but certainly the literary arts, every voice is essential. Without the political, protest, diasporic, voices of the poor, and even prison writing we have no distinctions. Our publications are necessary bridges, particularly in terms of generational, gender, and racial lines. In addition to informing, they engage us in broader cultural conversations.


The Baltimore Review Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)

The mission of The Baltimore Review is to showcase Baltimore as a literary hub of diverse writing and promote the work of emerging and established writers. The Baltimore Review was founded by Barbara Westwood Diehl in 1996 as a literary journal publishing short stories and poems, with a mission to showcase the best writing from the Baltimore area, from across the U.S., and beyond. Our mission remains just that. However, in our online format, we can now bring that fine writing to the world's attention, more frequently, and at less cost. We can also explore new ways to bring the world of writers and writing to the reader's attention.

The journal grew to become a nationally distributed journal, and later became an independent nonprofit organization in 2004. Susan Muaddi Darraj led the journal from 2003 to 2010, expanding contributions to include creative nonfiction and interviews. In 2011, Barbara Westwood Diehl resumed leadership of the journal. In 2012, The Baltimore Review began its new life as a quarterly, online literary journal. This doesn't mean that we've fallen out of love with the printed book. Work accepted for online publication will also be collected for annual print issues.


AGNI Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)

AGNI is a literary magazine housed at Boston University and known “among readers around the world,” as the writers group PEN put it, “for publishing important new writers early in their careers, many of them translated into English for the first time.” The print magazine appears twice yearly, in late April and late October. A very small portion of each is reprinted on this site, but you’ll also find a trove of writing published exclusively online, including categories like reviews and interviews that we tend not to feature in “the print.”

Most of the writing we publish comes to us unsolicited. Our authors and translators include Sharon Olds, Patricia Smith, Stephen Dixon, Donald Quist, Joan Wickersham, Michael Mejia, Maurice Carlos Ruffin, Rita Dove, Victoria Lancelotta, Jo Ann Beard, Peter Balakian, Noah Warren, Jenny Xie, Kaveh Akbar, Magdalena Tulli, Marilyn Hacker, Dorthe Nors, Bruce Smith, Cyrus Cassells, Melanie Rae Thon, Susan Bernofsky, Jill McDonough, Robert Long Foreman, Paisley Rekdal, Patrick Modiano, Lia Purpura, Anna Journey, and Maggie Smith.

Cherishing our differences as much as the verities we share, we are drawn to writers of every creed, race, orientation, gender, ethnicity, culture, national origin, age, and experience. We’re especially proud when we can lay claim to being the first to publish a new writer or translator.


The Studios of Key West Residency Program (Key West, FL – Deadline May 15)

The Studios offers a residency program for emerging and established artists and writers designed to encourage creative, intellectual and personal growth. The program grants nearly 35 artists each year the time and space to imagine new artistic work, engage in valuable dialogue and explore island connections.

The Studios’ residency program is community-based and built upon the hope that visiting artists will take inspiration from Key West’s rich artistic past and present, and will engage with — and be inspired by — the remarkable people and culture that surrounds them.

Key West’s official motto, “One Human Family” reflects our commitment to living together as caring, sharing neighbors dedicated to making our home as close to paradise as we can. To that end, we encourage artists of all races, nationalities, gender identities, sexual orientations, and abilities to apply. Residencies are almost a full month, and run from the 16th of the month through the 14th of the next.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   
 
BOMB’s Biennial Fiction Contest (Deadline May 5 – $1000)
American Chordata Call for Submissions (Deadline May 15)
PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship (Deadline May 15)
The Studios of Key West Residency Program (Key West, FL – Deadline May 15)
Gay Magazine Call for Submissions and Pitches (Chapter 1: Pleasure – Deadline May 17)
New Letters Conger Beasley Jr. Award for Nonfiction, Patricia Cleary Miller Award for Poetry, and Robert Day Award for Fiction (Deadline May 20 – $2500)
AGNI Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)
The Baltimore Review Call for Submissions (Deadline May 31)
Geometry Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
Contrary Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
Boulevard Poetry Contest for Emerging Poets (Deadline June 1 – $1000)
Backbone Press Lucille Clifton Poetry Prize (Deadline June 15 – $500)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)
The Los Angeles Review 2019 Literary Awards (Deadline June 30 – $1000)

Saturday
Apr202019

Submission Sunday 4.21.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship (Deadline May 15) 

PEN America’s Writing for Justice Fellowship will commission six writers—emerging or established—to create written works of lasting merit that illuminate critical issues related to mass incarceration and catalyze public debate.

The PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship aims to harness the power of writers and writing in bearing witness to the societal consequences of mass incarceration by capturing and sharing the stories of incarcerated individuals, their families, communities, and the wider impact of the criminal justice system. Our goal is to ignite a broad, sustained conversation about the dangers of over-incarceration and the imperative to mobilize behind rational and humane policies. As an organization of writers dedicated to promoting free expression and informed discourse, PEN America is honored to have been entrusted by the Art for Justice Fund to engage the literary community in addressing this pressing societal issue.


F(r)iction Call for Submissions

F(r)iction is the imprint of the international literacy nonprofit Brink Literacy Project. At the heart of our mission to increase literacy rates and engagement with storytelling, F(r)iction draws together the best works from our education programs and submissions.

For our print magazine, we accept short fiction, flash fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and comics—regardless of genre, style, or origin. Experimental, nontraditional, and boundary-pushing literature is strongly encouraged. Show us your wildest and weirdest! To get an idea of the kind of work we look for, we strongly encourage you to check out a past issue of F(r)iction, available in our shop. On our blog, we look to feature underrepresented voices and view points, with writing that challenges the norm and eschews the commonplace. Additionally, we want to be a home for webcomics that explore issues both universal and extraordinary.


New Letters
Conger Beasley Jr. Award for Nonfiction, Patricia Cleary Miller Award for Poetry, and Robert Day Award for Fiction
(Deadline May 20 – $2500)

The mission of New Letters magazine, its radio companion, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press, is to discover, publish and promote the best and most exciting literary writing, wherever it might be found. We publish and serve readers and writers worldwide. In recent years, New Letters has won a National Magazine Award, the industry's highest honor, plus multiple Pushcart Prizes, and is reprinted often in Best American anthologies.

The first New Letters Literary Awards competition was held in 1986. Its purpose was to discover, encourage, reward, and publish fresh, new material from aspiring and accomplished writers. In the first year of the competition, over 1,600 entries arrived from established and emerging writers across the country and around the world. Today, the contest remains one of the most influential and has become a model for similar competitions sponsored by various literary organizations. Each year, hundreds of entries from writers from all over the globe receive professional, anonymous judging from a distinguished panel. The best entries are then featured in the special awards issue of New Letters. Due to its continued commitment to anonymity and fairness, the New Letters Literary Awards has become one of the most respected literary contests in the country.


Hinterland
Call for Submissions


Hinterland
is a new quarterly, print and digital magazine, based out of the University of East Anglia, dedicated to creative non-fiction.

Hinterland offers an answer to the question ‘what is creative non-fiction?’ by showcasing the best new writing across the fields of memoir, essay, travel and food writing, reportage, psychoscape, biography, flash non-fiction and more. Our pages bring together work by established, award-winning authors alongside new writers, many of whom we are thrilled to publish for the first time and whose work, we promise, will merit your full attention. Often, the pieces you’ll find in Hinterland will straddle the boundaries between strands and be difficult to classify: we see this as a strength. Hinterland intends to challenge, move, entertain and, above all, be a fantastic read.


BOMB’s Biennial Fiction Contest (Deadline May 5 – $1000)

Each year BOMB hosts a literary contest to recognize the talents of an emerging writer, selected by a distinguished guest judge in the field. This year’s winner will receive a $1,000 prize and publication in BOMB’s literary supplement, First Proof. We are pleased to announce that this year’s fiction contest will be judged by writer and artist Renee Gladman.

BOMB Magazine has been publishing conversations between artists of all disciplines since 1981. BOMB’s founders—New York City artists and writers—decided to publish dialogues that reflected the way practitioners spoke about their work among themselvesToday, BOMB is a nonprofit, multi-platform publishing house that creates, disseminates, and preserves artist-generated content from interviews to artists’ essays to new literature. BOMB includes a quarterly print magazine, a daily online publication, and a digital archive of its previously published content from 1981 onward.


The Offing
Call for Submissions


The Offing
is an online literary magazine publishing creative writing in all genres and art in all media. The Offing publishes work that challenges, experiments, provokes—work that pushes literary and artistic forms and conventions. The Offing is a place for new and emerging writers to test their voices, and for established writers to test their limits. The Offing actively seeks out and supports work by and about those often marginalized in literary spaces, including Black and Indigenous people, and people of color; trans people, cis women, agender, gender non-conforming, genderqueer, two-spirit, and non-binary people; intersex people; LGBQA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, asexual/aromantic) people; people with disabilities; and especially people living at the intersections of these identities. The Offing believes that writers and artists deserve to be compensated for their work, and we pay our contributors.


Boulevard Poetry Contest for Emerging Poets
(Deadline June 1 – $1000)

$1,000 and publication awarded for the winning group of three poems by a poet who has not yet published a book of poetry with a nationally distributed press. Boulevard was founded in 1984 in New York City and incorporated in 1985 as a nonprofit by writer Richard Burgin. Its first issue, published January 2, 1986, featured fiction by Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer, poetry by Kenneth Koch, and interviews with renowned composers Philip Glass and Steve Reich and an essay on John Dos Passos and the Soviet Cinema. By its third issue in 1987, Boulevard had attained national bookstore distribution, which continues into the present.

Boulevard has published works by generations of important writers and critics, including John Ashbery, Ann Beattie, Billy Collins, Mark Doty, Jennifer Egan, Donald Hall, Alice Hoffman, David Mamet, Joyce Carol Oates, Carl Phillips, Francine Prose, Gerald Stern, Mark Strand, and others. Poet laureate Daniel Hoffman has called Boulevard “One of the half-dozen best literary journals.”


HippoCamp: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers 2019 Scholarships
(Deadline May 1)

HippoCamp, now in its fifth year, is a production of Hippocampus Magazine and Books LLC. This summer writing conference in PA is dedicated to creative nonfiction—the craft and the community! Hippocampus Magazine is awarding four full scholarships to HippoCamp 2019. One will definitely be awarded to a full-time undergraduate student, one will be awarded to a full-time graduate student, and for the other two student status does not matter. For this scholarship competition, we’ll consider quality of writing, financial need, and ambition, so we’re looking for a writing sample and some additional information.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   
  
DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press Chapbook Contest (Deadline April 26 – $1000)
CRAFT Short Fiction Prize (Deadline April 30 – $2000)
Redivider Beacon Street Prize (Deadline April 30 – $1000)
Blood Orange Review Inaugural Literary Contest (Deadline April 30 – $500)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)
HippoCamp: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers 2019 Scholarships (Deadline May 1)
BOMB’s Biennial Fiction Contest (Deadline May 5 – $1000)
PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship (Deadline May 15)
New Letters Conger Beasley Jr. Award for Nonfiction, Patricia Cleary Miller Award for Poetry, and Robert Day Award for Fiction (Deadline May 20 – $2500)
Contrary Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
Boulevard Poetry Contest for Emerging Poets (Deadline June 1 – $1000)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)

Sunday
Apr072019

Submission Sunday 4.7.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


A Public Space
Call for Submissions
(Deadline April 15)

A Public Space is an independent nonprofit publisher of an eponymous award-winning literary, arts, and culture magazine, and A Public Space Books. Under the direction of founding editor Brigid Hughes since 2006, it has been our mission to seek out overlooked and unclassifiable work, and to publish writing from beyond established confines. A Public Space offers three fellowships annually to fiction and nonfiction writers who have not yet published a book-length work. Fellows are selected through an open application each fall.


The 2019 Gulf Coast Prizes
(Deadline April 15 – $1500)

Judges: Garth Greenwell, Leslie Jamison, Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Entries for Gulf Coast Prizes in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry are accepted annually between March 1 and May 1. The contest awards $1,500 and publication in Gulf Coast to the winner in each genre. Two honorable mentions in each genre are awarded $250. All entries are considered for publication and the entry fee includes a one-year subscription to Gulf Coast.

Begun by Donald Barthelme and Phillip Lopate, Gulf Coast is the nationally-distributed journal housed within the University of Houston's English Department, home to one of the US's top ranked creative writing programs. We seek to promote and publish quality literature in our local and national communities while simultaneously teaching excellence in literary publishing to graduate and undergraduate students. While we are committed to providing a balanced combination of literary approaches and voices, all of the editorial positions are two-year terms, thus ensuring a regular turnover in the specific personality and style of the journal. In addition, Gulf Coast differs from many other literary journals in its commitment to exploring visual art and critical art writing. The journal has always featured portfolios by two artists, along with short introductions from critics familiar with their work.


Brevity
Call for Submissions

Brevity publishes well-known and emerging writers working in the extremely brief (750 words or less) essay form. We have featured work from two Pulitzer prize finalists, many NEA fellows, Pushcart winners, Best American authors, and writers from India, Egypt, Ireland, Spain, Malaysia, Qatar, and Japan. We have also featured numerous previously-unpublished authors, and take a special joy in helping to launch a new literary career. Over the past year Brevity has averaged 10,000 unique visitors per month. Authors are paid a $45 honorarium for featured essays and craft essays. We are not currently able to pay for book reviews.

Cosmonauts Avenue 2019 Nonfiction Prize (Deadline April 15 – $500)

JUDGE: Esmé Weijun Wang

Cosmonauts Avenue is an online, monthly literary journal run by women and non-binary folks dedicated to elevating and amplifying underrepresented voices. We publish fiction, poetry, nonfiction, interviews, and more, from writers around the world, in English and in translation. Submissions are free and always will be. This is one way we hope to remain accessible to all writers, whether new or emerging or established.

We are committed to providing a platform for folks who are marginalized in the literary community, including but not limited to people of color, ciswomen, trans men and women, nonbinary people, members of the LGBTQIA community, and people with disabilities. We want to elevate underrepresented voices and include a wide range of identities and experiences. We want work that pays careful attention to craft while remaining urgent and surprising. As Beyoncé might say, we want your most flawless work. We can’t wait to read it. We believe in you.


The Doctor T. J. Eckleburg Review
was founded in 2010 as an online and print literary and arts journal. We take our title from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and include the full archives of our predecessor Moon Milk Review. Our aesthetic is eclectic, literary mainstream to experimental. We appreciate fusion forms including magical realist, surrealist, meta- realist and realist works with an offbeat spin. We value character-focused storytelling and language and welcome both edge and mainstream with punch aesthetics. We like humor that explores the gritty realities of world and human experiences. Our issues include original content from both emerging and established writers, poets, artists and comedians such as authors, Rick Moody, Cris Mazza, Steve Almond, Stephen Dixon, poets, Moira Egan and David Wagoner and actor/comedian, Zach Galifianakis.


Currently, Eckleburg runs online, daily content of original fiction, poetry, nonfiction, translations, and more with featured artwork—visual and intermedia—from our Gallery. We run annual print issues, the Eckleburg Reading Series (DC, Baltimore and New York), as well as, the annual Gertrude Stein Award in Fiction, first prize $1000 and print publication, guest-judged by award-winning authors such as Rick Moody and Cris Mazza.


The Florida Review Annual Editors' Awards (Deadline April 15 – $1000)

The Florida Review publishes exciting new work from around the world from writers both emerging and well known. We are not Florida-exclusive, though we acknowledge having a jungle mentality and a preference for grit, and we have provided and continue to offer a home for many Florida writers. We have been in more or less continuous semi-annual print publication since 1975 and in 2017 added a new literary supplement in Aquifer: The Florida Review Online, which features new literary works on a weekly basis, as well as author interviews, book reviews, digital storytelling, visual arts, and short film.

Each year between January 1 and April 15, we accept submissions to our three Editors’ Awards contests in Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, and Poetry. Each winner receives publication in The Florida Review and $1,000 (upon publication). We also frequently recognize and publish one or more finalists in each genre.


Contrary Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)

Contrary® was founded in 2003 at the University of Chicago by students and alumni of Chicago’s Master of Arts Program in the Humanities. It was quickly embraced and has been abundantly nourished by graduates of the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing program. It now operates independently and without a thought of profit on the South Side of Chicago and publishes writers from throughout the world.

The first problem is the “Contrary” above the content. Why is it called Contrary, you might ask, when some of its content isn’t? We have a contemplation to confront this contradiction: we insist that all of our content is contrary. And, we insist, so is all of yours. Doesn’t it seem possible that all content is contrary, that there is no for, there is only against? Why else does the word contrary, so openly against something, have no antonym? What opposes contrary? Nothing. That which opposes contrary, by opposing, becomes contrary.

Besides, we tend to think contrarily, and we hope our magazine expresses contrarities that otherwise might go unexpressed: writings and images that confront entities, voids, and the edges of their own categories. As for that poetic nothing, the “Journal of Unpopular Discontent,” we conceal our dreams in the double negative, hoping to become a journal of popular content.


Idyllwild Arts Writers Week Fellowship
(July 1-5, 2019 – Deadline April 15)

Writers from around the world have found a special home at Idyllwild Arts. For decades, it has gathered thoughtful, provoking, and notable guests—among them Ray Bradbury, Norman Corwin, Lucille Clifton, Sharon Olds, Terrance Hayes, Billy Collins, Ted Kooser, Philip Levine, David St. John, and Natasha Trethewey. Join us to be inspired and challenged by world-class voices at our annual Writers Week.

We will be accepting submissions from February 1 through April 15; selections will be announced on May 1—six fellowships will be awarded. We are accepting poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Submit a 10 page work sample. By submitting work, you confirm that you will attend the 2019 Writers Week at Idyllwild Arts if selected. The fellowship covers tuition, meals and housing on campus. Fellowship recipients are responsible for their own transportation to and from Idyllwild, CA. Applicants must be over 18 years of age.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   
 
A Public Space Call for Submissions (Deadline April 15)
The 2019 Gulf Coast Prizes (Deadline April 15 – $1500)
Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)
Cosmonauts Avenue 2019 Nonfiction Prize (Deadline April 15 – $500)

MacDowell Colony Fellowships
(Peterborough, NH – Deadline April 15)

The Florida Review Annual Editors' Awards (Deadline April 15 – $1000)
Idyllwild Arts Writers Week Fellowship (July 1-5, 2019 – Deadline April 15)
The Frost Place Latinx and Gregory Pardlo Scholarships (Franconia, NH – Deadline April 15)
DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press Chapbook Contest (Deadline April 26 – $1000)
CRAFT Short Fiction Prize (Deadline April 30 – $2000)
Redivider Beacon Street Prize (Deadline April 30 – $1000)
Blood Orange Review Inaugural Literary Contest (Deadline April 30 – $500)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)
Contrary Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline June 1)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)

Sunday
Mar242019

Submission Sunday 3.24.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.

If you would like to receive the Submission Sunday list by email every other Sunday, please sign up for the WWLA newsletter.


Jack Jones Literary Arts: The Retreat (Santa Fe, NM – Deadline March 31)

Jack Jones Literary Arts is hosting its third annual writing retreat at Immaculate Heart of Mary Retreat Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico. This two-week retreat will be held October 26-November 8, 2019, and is open exclusively to women of color writers and nonbinary writers of color. Dr. Eve L. Ewing joins us as our 2019 Writer-in-Residence.

As part of the retreat experience, Jack Jones is featuring daily Skype master classes with agents, editors and acclaimed women and nonbinary people in publishing to promote networking, learning and engagement. These sessions are mandatory for retreat participants. Housing includes individual writing suites with private bedroom, private baths, writing areas, wifi, and all meals are provided.

Professional and emerging women writers of color and nonbinary writers of color at work on book projects are eligible for residencies. Women and nonbinary people with and without MFAs are eligible, and graduate students who are currently enrolled in a degree program are eligible to apply for a fellowship.


Redivider Beacon Street Prize (Deadline April 30 – $1000)

Launched in 1986, Redivider is a literary journal produced by the graduate students in the Writing, Literature, and Publishing program at Emerson College in the vibrant literary hub of Boston. Published digitally in the Autumn and Spring, we welcome fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic narrative submissions from emerging and established writers. And if you’re wondering about the name—it’s a palindrome!

Recently, Redivider shifted to a digital platform. This change is sparked by the urgency we―as with much of the publishing industry―feel towards the overall accessibility and diversity of our publication. Publishing our issues online will allow the voices of our contributors to reach more readers as our web content will be free for all. Additionally, we will drop submission fees most of the year to become more accessible to contributors.

Launched in 2012, the Beacon Street Prize is judged by expert judges and honors excellence and innovation. Welcoming submissions of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, the contest will open March 1 and close April 30th. The $10 entry fee will qualify each short story, essay, or group of poems for $1,000 each and publication in our autumn issue! This year’s prizes will be selected by Ocean Vuong for Poetry, SJ Sindu for Fiction, and Alex Marzano-Lesnevich for Nonfiction.


Off Assignment Call for Submissions

We have a hunch: that the best travel stories haven’t been told. That the most compelling world journeys don’t make it into print. That the way a writer digresses from a plan or pitch is precisely what warrants telling. Helmed by a collective of global writers, Off Assignment is a call for travel journalists, essayists with a sense of place, reporters with swollen notebooks, poets who wander, food writers with street cart taste—to go rogue. To write about what stuck and what haunts and what mattered most to their lives. We’re not here to guide vacations. We don’t cover spas or centennials. We care about voice and place and story. We want the writer back on the page—sweating, tripping, and telling a tale.

There is no Off Assignment "house style," just a taste for offbeat places, and a keen interest in "what surrounds the story," as journalist Ryszard Kapuscinski put it: "the atmosphere of the street, the feeling of the people, the gossip of the town, the smell; the thousand, thousand elements of reality that are part of the event you read about in 600 words in your morning paper."


Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing
(Deadline March 31 – $10,000)

The ethos of the modern world  is defined by immigrants. Their stories have always been an essential component of our cultural consciousness, from Isaac Bashevis Singer to Isabel Allende, from Milan Kundera  to Maxine Hong Kingston. In novels, short stories, memoirs, and works of journalism, immigrants have shown us what resilience and dedication we’re capable of, and have expanded our sense of what it means to be global citizens. In these times of intense xenophobia, it is more important than ever that these boundary-crossing stories reach the broadest possible audience.

With that in mind, we are proud to present The Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing. We are looking for extraordinary unpublished submissions from emerging writers of sharp, culture-straddling writing that addresses identity in a global age. Each year, a distinguished panel of judges will select a winning manuscript to be published by Restless Books. We can’t wait to read and share what the new voices of the world have to say.


Black Warrior Review
Boyfriend Village Call for Submissions
(Issue #3: Fox Boyfriend – Deadline March 31)

Black Warrior Review is pleased to announce that we’ll be reading submissions for our third online edition, Boyfriend Village. Submissions open March 1st and close March 31st. Boyfriend Village wants work that hungers and howls, that settles into bed soft and full of fire. It follows that our theme for this edition is Fox Boyfriend, loosely inspired by fox lore and origin stories. As always, this is up to interpretation, but BWR is interested in fairytale and myth, the visceral, the body, songs of survival, sensuality—work that interrogates and resists. We’re looking for poems, stories, and essays that defy form and expectation, that unspool worlds, inviting and dark. We’re also particularly interested in housing work that incorporates multimedia and visual elements: comics, graphic essays, video poems. We want things that transcend boundaries and dismantle binaries. Send us your foxy. Send us your spindly, your sprawling. Send us your boyfriends.

[Inspired by the former editor of Black Warrior Review, Zach Doss, who passed away in 2018.] All anyone can do is try to take what we have of Zach and thread it through our lives, carrying him forward in this way. Black Warrior Review, where we each served as editor, will name its new online edition Boyfriend Village, after Zach’s story, The Village with All of the Boyfriends. Zach writes, “The Village with All of the Boyfriends is where all of your boyfriends wind up eventually. You built this Village for them and they can’t leave and neither can you. You are not allowed inside, but you wait in the desert at the edge of town.”


Mentor and Muse Call for Submissions: Essays from Poets to Poets

As writers, we all come to the page differently, asking our own questions, seeking and scribbling down our own answers, and, of course, writing from our own experiences. Still, we share many of the same tendencies. We all learn by reading and enjoying the work of other writers. The idea is Art itself can be the artist’s best teacher. This was foremost in our minds in 2010, when we compiled our collection, Mentor and Muse: Essays from Poets to Poets (Southern Illinois University Press), an anthology of essays that investigates the elements of poetry through practice. The book unveils the insights poets gained while writing or reading a particular poem or set of poems. Each essay closes with a prompt that challenges readers to reconsider their own understanding of that principle.

With much excitement, we are now launching Mentor and Muse online. Working in our new electronic format, we hope to give more poets access to the already published essays, offer a wider range of topics, and acquire greater flexibility in both the style and medium in which poets engage their subjects. Each piece will again typically consist of three components—the essay, the prompt, and the poem(s) under consideration within the essay.


Tahoma Literary Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)

Tahoma Literary Review is published three times a year in both print and e-reader formats. We produce this literary journal with the aim of contributing to and sustaining a healthy literary ecosystem: We pay for all of the poetry, fiction, and nonfiction in our pages. Every member of our staff is paid. A major goal of Tahoma Literary Review is to show that writers and publishers can support each other not only artistically, but also financially.

We are committed to fairness in the editorial process. We don’t solicit work for our pages; everything we print comes from the open submission queue. Finally, we take contributor exposure seriously. Once you’ve been in our pages we publicize you and your work on social media as often as we can. We nominate published work for major literary awards and many smaller prizes. We also give contributors the option of blogging for us, and of recording audio of their published work for our SoundCloud feature.

Work published in our journal has been selected for Best American Poetry, Best Small Fictions, Best Gay Fiction, honorably mentioned in Best American Essays, and nominated for the Pushcart Prize by the Pushcart’s editorial staff. Many of the stories and poems we have published are included in anthologies and collections.


La Napoule Art Foundation Group Residency
(Mandelieu-La Napoule, France – Deadline March 31)

La Napoule Art Foundation’s guiding principle is to encourage artists to engage in cultural interchange and the creation of art that impacts the world for the common good. LNAF welcomes those engaged in a wide spectrum of artistic practice and varied backgrounds. The Group Residency from October 21 to Novmber 12, 2019 is open to individual artists—all disciplines and nationalities. All successful applicants receive accommodation, studio space, a $1,000 stipend, breakfast every morning, plus most evening meals.

The Chateau de LaNapoule is located in the historic seaside town of Mandelieu-La Napoule on the French Riviera. Situated on a spectacular site overlooking the sea, the building dates to the 14th Century and is recognized as a Monument Historique for its incredible restoration and architectural details. The former home of early 20th Century American sculptor, Henry Clews and his architect wife, Marie, it is now a museum housing Clews’ atelier and work, an impressive collection of 19th Century Clews’ Staffordshire Pottery, and additional galleries for hosting exhibits. The six acres of magnificent gardens surrounding the property have been honored as a Jardin Remarquable. Set within this walled compound is the sunny Belle Epoque Villa Marguerite. This mansion, located just across the gardens from the beaches, was the former home of the Austrian Princess of Pless. The Chateau, the walled gardens, and the historic village are inspirational settings for artists of all disciplines. The climate and the incredible light of this region have attracted artists for centuries.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   

Crannóg Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Pembroke Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Tahoma Literary Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Jack Jones Literary Arts: The Retreat (Santa Fe, NM – Deadline March 31)
Memoir Mixtapes Call for Submissions (Vol. 9: Family – Deadline March 31)
Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing (Deadline March 31 – $10,000)
La Napoule Art Foundation Group Residency (Mandelieu-La Napoule, France – Deadline March 31)
Black Warrior Review Boyfriend Village Call for Submissions (Issue #3: Fox Boyfriend – Deadline March 31)
Chautauqua Call for Submissions (Deadline April 1)
Polis Books Call for Pitches: Both Sides—An Anthology of Border Noir (Deadline April 1)
MacDowell Colony Fellowships (Peterborough, NH – Deadline April 15)

Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)
The Frost Place Latinx and Gregory Pardlo Scholarships (Franconia, NH – Deadline April 15)
DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press Chapbook Contest (Deadline April 26 – $1000)
CRAFT Short Fiction Prize (Deadline April 30 – $2000)
Redivider Beacon Street Prize (Deadline April 30 – $1000)
Blood Orange Review Inaugural Literary Contest (Deadline April 30 – $500)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)

Sunday
Mar102019

Submission Sunday 3.10.19

Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.


DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press Chapbook Contest (Deadline April 26 – $1000)

The 2019 New Michigan Press/DIAGRAM chapbook contest is up and running. We pick the majority of our chapbook list each year from the ranks of the chapbook contest finalists, so this is the best way to get your work read by our eager readers. And what's more, it's all read blind. Plus you get a free chapbook for entering. Deadline's 04.26.19. $1000 + publication to the winner + publication to a handful of finalists.

DIAGRAM is an electronic journal of text and art. As our name indicates, we're interested in representations. In naming. In indicating. In schematics. In the labelling and taxonomy of things. In poems that masquerade as stories; in stories that disguise themselves as indices or obituaries. We value the insides of things, vivisection, urgency, risk, elegance, flamboyance, work that moves us, language that does something new, or does something old--well. We like iteration and reiteration. Ruins and ghosts. Mechanical, moving parts, balloons, and frenzy. Buzz us.


The Spectacle Call for Submissions (Deadline March 15)

We’re a little cracked, and we like it that way. We aim for content that reminds us that our lenses matter—they focus, distort, clarify, conceal. We seek out and publish revelatory writing, while also knowing that there are forms of revelation that come only through distortion or concealment. Aristotle, in his Poetics, isolated six aspects of dramatic art, of which “spectacle” (opsis) was the least important. We disagree.

We like scholars who write great poetry, poets who write incisive monographs, credulous skeptics, wary believers, hidebound experimentalists, radical realists, mystical engineers, analytical mystics, catholic snobs, and modish antiquarians. We have a soft spot for keen amateurs and sincere dilettantes. We actively seek to transgress the border between creative and critical work: see, for example, Dan Beachy-Quick’s essay-poems in our inaugural issue.

The Spectacle is based out of the English, Creative Writing, and Visual Art departments at Washington University in St. Louis. We are committed to publishing work from under-represented voices, including people of color, women, LGBTQ and gender-non-conforming artists/writers, and people who have disabilities. The Spectacle publishes issues twice a year; our blog, The REVUE, features a more frequently revolving cast of flash, poems, comedy writing, reviews, and other pieces.


Sonora Review 2019 Poetry & Fiction Call & Contest (Theme: Doubt – Deadline March 15 – $1000)

For Issue 76, we seek work that shows us doubt in its many forms and how we go about expressing it. R.O. Kwon will judge the fiction contest and Raquel Salas Rivera will judge the poetry contest.

This call is two-fold:

  1. Fiction and poetry contest submissions.
  2. Non-contest submissions, in fiction, nonfiction, poetry and flash prose.
Our doubts are tethered to our beliefs. And are when they come into conflict is that when the “real work” begins as Wendell Berry suggests? If so, how do we reckon with our doubts? How does a someone handle doubt in a marriage versus doubt in a religion? Which is to say, how does doubt shape-shift from person to person, culture to culture? Are there ideas, situations, conflicts that return us back, always, to what we know and don’t know? Which means returning us, always, back to doubt?


The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)

The Wax Paper is seeking all forms of moving words and still images for our quarterly printed broadsheet. We are distributed nationally and all written work will be archived on our website in audio format. Current reading period is open until June 30th. All contributors are given a lifetime subscription.

The Wax Paper is a broadsheet publication open to all forms of written word, image, and collected conversation. The Wax Paper will contain two sheets printed quarterly on heavy (35lb.) newsprint in broadsheet format (22" x 28"). The first priority of The Wax Paper is to expand our understanding of the people we share the world with, and in doing so, expand our understanding of ourselves. Pieces will be selected on their ability to illuminate the humanity and significance of the subjects that inhabit the work.

The Wax Paper was inspired by the life of Louis “Studs” Terkel. Our name is taken after his first radio show, The Wax Museum, a groundbreaking program, emblematic of his democratic fondness of variety, in which arias were played alongside folk ballads. We look to populate The Wax Paper with pieces that share the spirit inherent in Studs’ written work.  Work that required patient observation, remained steadfast in its empathy, and displayed genuine vitality.


Blood Orange Review
Inaugural Literary Contest
(Deadline April 30 – $500)

Winners in each genre (fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) will receive $500 and publication in the contest issue of Blood Orange Review. All entries will also be considered for publication in a forthcoming issue of Blood Orange Review. The contest judges are Aisha Sabatini Sloan (nonfiction), Aimee Phan (fiction), and Jericho Brown (poetry).

Blood Orange Review  was founded by Stephanie Lenox and H.K. Hummel, and its inaugural issue appeared online in April 2006. The first thirty issues encompass over 200 writers and artists. In 2008, Bryan Fry, an English Department faculty member at Washington State University, joined the editorial team and established a student internship, which allowed the journal to serve as an educational tool for students interested in editing.


Polis Books Call for Pitches: Both Sides—An Anthology of Border Noir (Deadline April 1)

We are thrilled to announce BOTH SIDES: An Anthology of Border Noir, edited by Bram Stoker Award nominee Gabino Iglesias. We are officially accepting submissions for this unique, timely, and important anthology. Agora Books, the new imprint dedicated to publishing diverse voices in crime fiction, will release BOTH SIDES in 2020.

From Gabino Iglesias: La frontera is full of stories. Real stories, not those Trump makes up. The border is a powerful place where countries collide. It’s a weird space of dreams, struggles, promises, lies, fear, and redemption. It’s a multicultural and bilingual space where people know that hustling to protect your loved ones or offer them a better life is a drive strong enough to blur ethical codes. Sadly, the border is also a place where drugs make people a lot of money, corruption stains everything, and violence fills the landscape with danger and ghosts. In ZERO SAINTS, I wrote this: “What happens when you cross la frontera is that you shatter, you stop being you and turn into a new person that belongs nowhere, that has no home, no roots. Going back is impossible and moving forward is like jumping into a cave and hoping that it’s not too deep, that the rocks don’t mangle you too much, and that el monstruo that waits for you en la oscuridad is not too hungry.” Now I want some of the most talented authors to visit this space from their perspective. I want them to show the world what they see on both sides. It’s time to give border noir the attention it deserves.


CRAFT
Short Fiction Prize
(Deadline April 30 – $2000)

Submissions are open March 1 to April 30, 2019. Guest judge Elizabeth McCracken will choose three stories from a shortlist of fifteen. CRAFT works with all writers, established as well as emerging. We use craft as a focal point and a lens through which to present fiction.

Each published work of fiction includes an author’s note which discusses the craft in the story. We love that this gives each writer the opportunity to present an inside look at their work. In some cases, authors speak about the origin of a story. Others write about a specific element, such as point-of-view or the use of time. In every case, we’ve been inspired to reread the story after reading the author’s note, and we hope you will want to do the same!


MacDowell Colony Fellowships (Peterborough, NH – Deadline April 15)

The mission of The MacDowell Colony is to nurture the arts by offering creative individuals of the highest talent an inspiring environment in which they can produce enduring works of the imagination. The sole criterion for acceptance is artistic excellence, which The MacDowell Colony defines in a pluralistic and inclusive way. We encourage applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics, and who are investigating an unlimited array of inquiries and concerns.

The MacDowell Colony provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees. MacDowell Fellows are selected by our admissions panels, which are comprised of a revolving group of distinguished professionals in each artistic discipline who serve anonymously for three years.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   

The Spectacle
Call for Submissions
(Deadline March 15)
Jet Fuel Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 15)
The Missouri Review
Miller Audio Prize
(Deadline March 15 – $1000)
Djerassi Resident Artists Program (Woodside, CA – Deadline March 15)
Sonora Review 2019 Poetry & Fiction Call & Contest (Theme: Doubt – Deadline March 15 – $1000)

Pembroke Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Memoir Mixtapes Call for Submissions (Vol. 9: Family – Deadline March 31)
Crannóg Call for Submissions (Open for month of March)
Chautauqua Call for Submissions (Deadline April 1)
Polis Books Call for Pitches: Both Sides—An Anthology of Border Noir (Deadline April 1)
MacDowell Colony Fellowships (Peterborough, NH – Deadline April 15)

Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)
The Frost Place Latinx and Gregory Pardlo Scholarships (Franconia, NH – Deadline April 15)
DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press Chapbook Contest (Deadline April 26 – $1000)
CRAFT Short Fiction Prize (Deadline April 30 – $2000)
Blood Orange Review Inaugural Literary Contest (Deadline April 30 – $500)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)
The Wax Paper
Call for Submissions
(Deadline June 30)

Sunday
Feb242019

Submission Sunday 2.24.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.


Djerassi Resident Artists Program (Woodside, CA – Deadline March 15)

Residencies are awarded competitively, at no cost, to national and international artists in the disciplines of choreography, literature, music composition, visual arts, media arts, and science. We seek applications from emerging and mid-career artists, for whom appointments as resident artists may make a significant difference to their careers, as well as from established artists with national and/or international reputations.

Djerassi Program is designed as a retreat experience to pursue personal creative work and share collegial interaction within a small community of artists. Djerassi Program is located in a spectacular rural setting in the Santa Cruz Mountains over-looking the Pacific Ocean, yet is within easy driving distance of San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area.


The Idaho Review
Call for Submissions (Deadline March 7)

In 1997, English Professor Mitch Wieland approached then-Provost Daryl Jones with the idea to start a new literary journal at Boise State University. The journal was envisioned as a precursor to Boise State's upcoming MFA Program in Creative Writing. The inaugural issue was published in late 1998. From the six short stories in the first issue, three of them made the top 100 stories of the year list in The Best American Short Stories 1998. Over the years, the journal has published emerging writers alongside of established writers.

Our mission is to publish strong, evocative work that belongs to the collective, vast community of writers. As we move forward we intend to broaden our reach. We hope to include writers of different identities—in terms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, ability, language, religion, class, age, education, and region—so that our journal is a representation of the voices present in today’s literary community.


Glimmer Train Call for Final Contests: Fiction and Very Short Fiction (Deadline February 28 – $3000)

So many stories we've read since we started. A person might think they'd begin to seem all the same, but they don't. Without fail, the stories we read each month move, surprise, and change us. We are grateful to the writers for this gift, and to you, dear readers, for completing the circle, for opening yourself to their generous offerings. We two sisters read every story ourselves, and we pay writers over $50,000 a year (almost 3/4 of that to emerging writers).

We will be accepting stories for print publication for the next 3 months. We are eager to read yours! Glimmer Train tries to set the bar for treating writers with respect, and continues—after 28 years —to actively champion emerging writers.


Memoir Mixtapes Call for Submissions (Vol. 9: Family – Deadline March 31)

Memoir Mixtapes is a mashup of the two things we all love to talk about: ourselves and music. Music never fails to evoke real emotions connected to real memories, however fleeting, superficial, profound, blissful, or distressing those emotions might be. We know most of our fellow human beings can relate, and we think sharing the stories we have, along with the songs that conjure them, is a great way to connect with each other while building some pretty groovy (or, at the very least, very “interesting”) playlists in the process.

We want to read your CNF stories and poems about family—not just holiday stories and poems, but all family tales. Tell us about a family vacation you loved or hated. Tell us about your strained relationship with your siblings. Tell us about how you found common-ground with that one cranky grandparent and got them to open up. The options are wide open here! Whether you come from a tight-knit group of weirdos, or are estranged from the people who share your bloodline, or even if you have a different idea of what family means in your life (they do say the blood of the covenant is thicker than that of the womb), we want to hear what you have to say.


Chautauqua Call for Submissions (Deadline April 1)

Chautauqua publishes writing that expresses the values of the Chautauqua Institution, broadly construed: a sense of inquiry into questions of personal, social, political, spiritual, and aesthetic importance—and when, where, and how those values and questions intersect.

The editors of Chautauqua are seeking poems, short stories, essays, and flash that explore boundaries—lines of demarcation that interrupt but also allow for new bridges and crossing points. Submissions should explore the notion of boundaries—personal, spiritual, geographic, social, political. Our interest lies in how characters define and establish borders and if, why, or how they cross them. Thresholds can open into new realms; fractures and rifts can divide us; safe passages can open up in the most unlikely places. When do we strike out looking for new frontiers or adventures? How do we find the path needed to navigate our way home—wherever that is? What does it mean to push a boundary? How does pushing one boundary reshape another? Are we able to bind instead of separate, creating a moment of beauty?


Jet Fuel Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 15)

Through Lewis University, Jet Fuel Review is run entirely by students under the supervision of faculty advisers Dr. Simone Muench and Dr. Jackie White. In the spirit of journals such as Joliet Junior College’s Wordeater, Illinois Wesleyan University’s Tributaries, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Dear Navigator, Lewis alumna Mary Egan launched a journal run by students with a national scope for publication. Though this journal is run by English majors attending Lewis University, a university nestled in the Midwest, we hope to reach people thousands of miles from our verdant campus by being entirely online.

Plainly said, we have faith in online media, and we think it’s the best way to spread a love of the arts and to connect artists in a community that reaches beyond the boundaries of a physical community. Since fiction, poetry, and artwork are all about breaking down boundaries and pushing past expectations, an online venue is the logical choice for our contributors to reach as many people as possible, and for us to cultivate a creative community for anyone who happens to click on our site and like what they see.


Hunger Mountain Literary Prizes (Deadline March 1 – $1000)

Hunger Mountain holds five annual contests: The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction Prize, The Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction Prize, The Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, The Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing, and The International Young Writers Prize. All contests open for submission from October 1 to March 1.

Hunger Mountain was started in 2002 by founding editor Caroline Mercurio through a generous donation from a Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing alumnus. The journal has thrived since then with the assistance of MFA in writing faculty and ongoing support from the Vermont College of Fine Arts, VCFA alums, subscribers and friends of Hunger Mountain.


The Frost Place Latinx and Gregory Pardlo Scholarships (Franconia, NH – Deadline April 15)

The Frost Place is a nonprofit educational center for poetry and the arts based at Robert Frost’s old homestead, which is owned by the town of Franconia, New Hampshire. Since 1977, The Frost Place has awarded a fellowship each summer to an emerging American poet, including a cash stipend and the opportunity to live and write in the house for several months. In addition, The Frost Place has sponsored an annual Festival and Conference on Poetry for writers seeking classes and workshops with a faculty of illustrious poets, a teachers’ conference, and an advanced seminar.

The Frost Place invites submissions to the first annual Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets. This scholarship, which is funded by an anonymous donor, was named to honor Gregory Pardlo, Pulitzer Prize winning poet and faculty at The Frost Place 2015 Poetry Seminar. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar (August 4- 10 2019)  at The Frost Place, including room and board (valued at approximately $1,550), and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. The 2019 LatinX Scholarship is designed to encourage the LatinX voice in poetry and the literary arts, both at The Frost Place and in the broader literary community. The winner will receive a full fellowship to attend the Conference on Poetry at The Frost Place, July 6 - 12, 2019, including tuition, room, board, and travel.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   

Creative Nonfiction Call for Submissions (Theme: Memoir - Deadline February 25 – $2500)
Glimmer Train Call for Final Contests: Fiction and Very Short Fiction (Deadline February 28 – $3000)
Clarion Workshop Call for Applications (Deadline March 1)
Hunger Mountain Literary Prizes (Deadline March 1 – $1000)
The Journal Non/Fiction Collection Prize (Deadline March 1 – $1500)
Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline March 1)
The Idaho Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 7)
Jet Fuel Review Call for Submissions (Deadline March 15)
The Missouri Review
Miller Audio Prize
(Deadline March 15 – $1000)
Djerassi Resident Artists Program (Woodside, CA – Deadline March 15) 
Pembroke Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Memoir Mixtapes Call for Submissions (Vol. 9: Family – Deadline March 31)
Crannóg Call for Submissions (Open for month of March)
Chautauqua Call for Submissions (Deadline April 1)

Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)
The Frost Place Latinx and Gregory Pardlo Scholarships (Franconia, NH – Deadline April 15)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)

Sunday
Feb102019

Submission Sunday 2.10.19


Our consultants can help you edit your drafts, prepare your submissions, and find places to submit! Contact us for customized submission assistance.


Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)

Tiny Nightmares will be a collection of  short and terrifying tales of monsters, madness, and nightmares. The anthology follows up on Tiny Crimes, an antholothology of short crime fiction featuring stories by Carmen Maria Machado, Yuri Herrera, Brian Evenson, Amelia Gray, and more. 

For Tiny Nightmares, we’re seeking short stories that play with and expand the boundaries of horror fiction -- think of the stretch of unlit highway between Jordan Peele’s Get Out, Samanta Schweblin’s Fever Dream, and Stephen King’s IT. Stories that turn our understanding of “scary” on its (trembling) head. We’re looking for:

  • Stories of new monsters, and old ones that scare us in new ways
  • Tiny, intimate horrors to make our hair stand on end
  • Horror as cultural/political/environmental funhouse mirror
  • Subversions of traditional horror tropes
  • Something so scary we haven’t thought of it yet

Stories should be under 1200 words. Stories should be previously unpublished.


Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)

Writing By Writers is pleased to offer fellowships to Esalen Writer's Camp for emerging writers of color and members of the LGBTQIA+ community to amplify all voices that need to be heard. Fellowships cover the full cost of tuition, a shared room and all meals, but do not cover transportation.

​An "Emerging Voice" is someone who is currently DOES NOT meet any of the below criteria*:

  • Has an B.A., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. or minors in Creative Writing.
  • Currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs.
  • Writers who have published one or more books through major publishing houses, university presses, or established presses.
  • Current professional magazine/newspaper feature writers or editors.
  • Writers who are widely published in top tier literary journals and/or magazines.

​The deadline to apply for a fellowship is April 15th and winners will be notified by May 1st. Selection will be based on a writing sample and short statement about why you are interested in attending Esalen Writer's Camp. All submissions will be reviewed by Samantha Dunn and the finalists will be selected by Samantha Dunn and the WxW Board of Directors.


Crannóg Call for Submissions (Open for month of March)

Ireland's premier fiction and poetry magazine since 2002. Crannóg’s mission is to publish the work of Irish writers alongside the best available worldwide and to show how well such writing sits with the best available internationally. This has a dual effect of giving writers a world platform to have their work read in print and also brings work of an international standard to the attention of an Irish audience.



The Missouri Review
Miller Audio Prize
(Deadline March 15 – $1000)

The Missouri Review, founded in 1978, is one of the most highly-regarded literary magazines in the United States and for the past thirty-four years we’ve upheld a reputation for finding and publishing the very best writers first. We are based at the University of Missouri and publish four issues each year. Each issue contains approximately five new stories, three new poetry features, and two essays, all of which is selected from unsolicited submissions sent from writers throughout the world. The Missouri Review welcomes submissions to our 12th Annual Miller Audio Prize.

Poetry: Submit an original poem or collection of poems as a single audio file. Entries may be solely author-read or contain other voices, sounds, or music.

Prose: Submit a short story or piece of creative nonfiction. Entries may be solely author-read or contain other voices, sounds, or music.

Humor: Submit your funniest poem, story, or piece of creative nonfiction. Entries may be solely author-read or contain other voices, sounds, or music.

Audio Documentary: Submit an audio documentary on any subject. Documentaries can be presented in a variety of forms including narrative, interview, or documentary play.


Granta Call for Submissions (Deadline February 21)

From Nobel laureates to debut novelists, international translations to investigative journalism, each themed issue of Granta turns the attention of the world’s best writers on to one aspect of the way we live now. Granta does not have a political or literary manifesto, but it does have a belief in the power and urgency of the story and its supreme ability to describe, illuminate and make real.

Granta magazine was founded in 1889 by students at Cambridge University as The Granta, a periodical of student politics, badinage and literary enterprise, named after the river that runs through the town. In this original incarnation it published the work of writers like A.A. Milne, Michael Frayn, Stevie Smith, Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. In 1979, Bill Buford transformed Granta from a student publication to the literary quarterly it remains today. Granta Books came ten years later, quickly becoming one of the most independent-minded and prestigious literary publishers in the UK.


Orion Magazine Call for Entries: The Place Where You Live

Since its inaugural issue, printed in 1982, Orion has explored the ways in which our places—our homes, our neighborhoods, our landscapes—shape us, and what it might mean to care for them in return.

“The Place Where You Live” is an ongoing project (which has appeared in various forms over the years, from print to digital) that’s meant to provide readers with space to record ideas about place: What connects you to your place? What history does it hold for you? What are your hopes and fears for it? What do you do to protect it, or prepare it for the future, or make it better? Click on the map above to find entries from all over the world.

Your contribution can take the form of a short essay of up to 350 words, and may include photographs, a painting, drawing, or handmade map. Also, in a collaboration begun in 2012, some contributors will be invited to read their entries aloud on the nationally syndicated (U.S.) public radio show Living on Earth.


DUM DUM Zine Call for Submissions


DUM DUM Zine
publishes experimental lit and art that embraces all creative forms. When we’re not publishing our annual zine, we’re constantly searching for new multi-platform literature and art to share online.

In the past we’ve featured hybrid fiction and poetry, text message interviews, experimental music and art reviews, prank email chains, crowd-sourced community photo projects, and even serialized radio plays. We are looking for submissions that embody, even transcend these categories, maybe even creating a hybrid of each! Show us what you’ve got! We want you to become part of our growing collective of Dummies.


The Journal Non/Fiction Collection Prize
(Deadline March 1 – $1500)

The award-winning literary journal of The Ohio State University, The Journal contributes significantly toward the literary landscape of Ohio and the nation. The Journal seeks to identify and encourage emerging writers while also attracting the work of established writers to create a diverse and compelling magazine. The Journal has recently had poems reproduced in the Best American Poetry anthology.

The Non/Fiction Collection Prize is awarded annually to a book-length collection of short stories, essays, or a combination of the two. The prize (which in previous iterations was known as the Sandstone Prize and The Ohio State University Prize in Short Fiction) carries a cash award of $1500 and publication with The Ohio State University Press under its standard contract. The award is open to writers of fiction and creative nonfiction, whether or not they have previously published a book.

 

Upcoming Deadlines   

Mineral School 2019 Artists Residency (Mineral, WA – Deadline February 15)
YesYes Books 2019 Pamet River Prize and Vinyl 45 Chapbook Prize (Deadline February 15 – $1000 & $250)
Granta Call for Submissions (Deadline February 21)
Creative Nonfiction Call for Submissions (Theme: Memoir - Deadline February 25 – $2500)
Clarion Workshop Call for Applications (Deadline March 1)
The Journal Non/Fiction Collection Prize (Deadline March 1 – $1500)
Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts Call for Submissions (Deadline March 1)
The Missouri Review
Miller Audio Prize
(Deadline March 15 – $1000)
Crannóg Call for Submissions (Open for month of March)
Pembroke Magazine Call for Submissions (Deadline March 31)
Esalen Writer's Camp Emerging Voices Fellowship (Deadline April 15)
Waxwing Call for Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Dorothy Call for Manuscript Submissions (Deadline May 1)
Catapult/Soft Skull Tiny Nightmares Call for Anthology Submissions (Deadline May 1 – $100)